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A detailed analysis on the three Superloaders


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#1 Jweb

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 10:32 PM

The Pinokio, the Prophecy, or the Rotor???

Alright then, what follows is a complex and detailed analysis of each of the three superloaders in paintball in order to help you better decide which one is right for you. Let me first begin by saying that no superloader is overall the "best" despite what people will argue over and over again. Each of the three is very good at what they do and they each have their own place in the loader hall of fame. This informational report is solely to show and explain how each is different or better in key areas.

I own all three superloaders and use each one of them an equal amount so I will attempt to be unbiased in this report. Originally I was planning on doing this report with only owning a Dye Rotor but after picking up a Prophecy for pretty cheap I decided the only way to accurately complete this report was to own all three. In time I picked up a Pinokio thus completing the superloader collection.

Please note that this analysis is on the Pinokio loader, the Empire Prophecy 2.0 Loader, and the Generation 3 Dye Rotor. Before going into great detail on each of the loaders I will briefly describe the criteria that each loader will be examined on:

1. Ball capacity – How many balls can it hold? Plus the capacity on any modified shells. Bear in mind that the amounts are based off of actually counting the paintballs rather than what the company claims.

2. Weight – How much does it weigh empty and full? w/ batteries of course

3. Height/Width/Length profile – How high is it, how wide is it? How much of a target does it make?

4. Batteries/efficiency – What kinds of batteries does it take? How many shots on fresh batteries?

5. Available settings – Is it a one push button loader or are there settings to tweak?

6. Ease of taking it apart/cleaning it/changing batteries – Is it hard to take apart? What tools are needed? If I break a ball inside will I be out for several games cleaning it?

7. Feed rate – How fast can it push balls into my wicked awesome marker?

8. Price – How much is it going to run me new? What about used?

9. Colors – Will it match my rainbow colored marker? How many different colors does it come in?

10. Aftermarket accessories – Stock loaders aren't my thing, what modifications can I add to it?

11. Reball compatibility – Can I use reballs with it?

12. Durability – Will it survive impacts on the field? Will it break easily?

13. Tendency to jam – How often does it tend to jam?

14. Ball detection system – What kind does it use?

15. Rip drive – Does it come with one? Nobody likes reaching their hand into the hopper to clear jams.

16. Position of feedneck in regards to Gun – Will the hopper tap you in the mask when you line the marker up to your nose?

17. Noise – How noisy is it?


Pinokio loader analysis:

We'll start this analysis off in alphabetical order and that means starting with the Pinokio or the 'Nokio as it is affectionately referred to. The Pinokio arrived on the market in 2008 and quickly became noted due to its optional large nose attachment (obviously how it gets its name). It is not as popular as the Prophecy or the Rotor despite being released before both of them. Popularity set aside it can still take a beating as well as dish it out. The Pinokio is most often slammed for its high profile and awkward looking shape when compared to the sleekness of the Rotor and Prophecy. The Pinokio comes with the large nose piece as well as a good snapping lid which is easy to open due to the fins of plastic that stretch back over the loader.

Ball capacity:

The main reason why the Pinokio gets as much attention as it does is because of its ability to hold a lot of paintballs plain and simple. With the standard nose installed it will hold approx. 240 paintballs and with the long nose a whopping 370 paintballs! If you are looking to hold a crazy amount of paint on the field or are an avid back player who needs a lot of suppression fire, the Pinokio is certainly worth a look. Attaching the nose attachment to your Pinokio hopper is a surefire way of getting noticed on the field and becoming the guy to watch out for, especially among the rental players.

Weight:


The hopper weighs in at around 1 pound with the standard nose attachment making it the lightest of the three superloaders. Full with paintballs the standard Pinokio will weigh 2 pounds 13 ounces. With the long nose it weighs in at around 1 pound 7 ounces empty and 3 pounds 14 ounces with that lovely nose completely full.

Height/width/length:


The Pinokio has a height of 6 ¾ inches from the feedneck to the highest point making it the highest of the three superloaders. The width of the loader is 3 ¾ inches at its widest point. The length of the Pinokio loader with the standard nose is 9 ¼ inches and 18 inches with the long nose attached. Interestingly, the extended nose does not extend the width of the hopper so it does not make it a larger target from the front. Many players claim that the Pinokio's large nose offers a bigger target and that is true from the sides but certainly not when looking at the loader head on.

Batteries/efficiency:

The Pinokio runs on two 9-volt batteries and is claimed to be able to feed 30+ cases or 60,000 shots on only those two little 9-volts. This makes it the most efficient of the three superloaders. Taking a look at battery cost the Pinokio gets only 0.000083 cents per shot which puts it second behind the Rotor (assuming the average cost of two 9-volts being $5). The Pinokio is also the only superloader to use 9 volt batteries as its standard power source, both of the other two superloaders use AA's out of the box.

Available settings:

There are no settings at all to fumble with on the Pinokio whatsoever and its simplicity is another factor that it is usually praised for. It involves one simple push button, it is either on or it is off, that's it. Its operation is so foolproof that the only literature included with the loader is a single piece of paper detailing a few simple processes like attaching the long nose piece. A simple LED light turns green indicating the loader is on and will flash red when feeding. A solid red light when not feeding indicates a low battery. Please note that if a Pinokio has an upgraded P-board the LED light will remain red all of the time.

Ease of taking it apart/cleaning it/changing batteries:

The Pinokio is the only superloader that does not come apart in your hands like the Prophecy and Rotor do. Still it is incredibly easy to clean as removing the top part of where the long nose attaches will enable you to get inside the Pinokio. To remove the propeller you are going to need at least a 6 inch screwdriver to get it out as it is deep inside the loader. The batteries can be easily changed on the Pinokio by simply sliding the battery compartment door off and then sliding it back on again, no tools necessary. The Pinokio can also be cleaned by using a spray bottle and cleaning the loader out with straight water.

Check out Mike's video on this:

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ria-Sd9aGA"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=8ria-Sd9aGA[/url]

Feed rate:

The Pinokio can feed an impressive rate of 20+ balls per second according to the makers of the Pinokio but it has been clocked much higher at around 30 bps. Obviously the Pinokio will feed as many balls per second as any tournament will allow.

Price:

The Pinokio is usually sold between 120 and 140 dollars new, putting it in between the Prophecy and Rotor selling points. The Pinokio tends to go for around 80 to 100 dollars used.

Colors:

The three main colors the Pinokio comes in are black, smoke (transparent), as well as clear. Bear in mind that the black color option is the only color that is not transparent so it will require you to look through the lid to see how many balls are remaining. The clear color will obviously give you the advantage of being able to see the balls but it may make you more noticeable with bright paintballs inside. The smoke color is right in between as it gives you the ability to see paint as well as shading the color of the balls inside. There are also several less common colors found on the Pinokio website such as green camo and grey/black camo. "Pinoko hoppers" can also paint your Nokio any color if you contact them and purchase it from them directly.

Aftermarket accessories:


There are very few accessories for the Pinokio at the current time. Halo speedfeeds will fit on the Pinokio as Halo loaders use the same size opening. You can also get a Pinokio loader P board to improve the speed of your loader.

Reball compatibility:

Overall Pinokios tend to accept Reballs very well. Mike's video of shooting 5 pods of Reballs had no jams whatsoever.

Check out Mike's video on this:

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vcsMkfQlPQs"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=vcsMkfQlPQs[/url]

Durability:

While I don't have a specific video showing the Pinokio's durability, the loader is made to take and dish out a beating and is made of very strong plastic. Durability is a huge factor with the Pinokio as due to its unusual shape and swept back design it can be subject to different hits and impacts out on the field.

Tendency to jam:

Pinokios hardly ever jam, plain and simple. The simple design of the propeller inside makes jamming a very rare event out on the field. It is not uncommon for Pinokio owners to have never had a jam with their hopper. Evan from Pinokio hoppers claimed that the Pinokio does not have any sort of un-jamming device because the Pinokio simply never jams.

Ball detection system:

The Pinokio uses a bend sensor to know when balls need to be fed into the marker. This simple ribbon sensor sits in the feedneck and activates the propeller whenever a ball moves past it so the Pinokio only feeds when your marker is firing.

Rip drive:

The Pinokio has no rip drive and basically any Pinokio owner will tell you that one is hardly necessary. As stated, Pinokios have excellent track records.

Position of feedneck in regards to the marker:

The Pinokio is also known for its swept back design which can make it slightly awkward for players who are used to their loader being situated further ahead on their marker. The main reason for the Pinokio's swept back design is to give it some stability when the long nose is attached and eventually filled with paintballs. The Pinokio sweeps back a total of 6 inches from the back of the feedneck to the back the loader.

Noise:

The running noise of the Pinokio is practically nothing at all though it seems to have the loudest running noise of the three superloaders, the Pinokio gives off almost a whining sound when feeding balls. Interestingly, since the propeller feeds about 5-7 balls per spin when you are shooting one ball every few seconds the propeller will spin like it is trying to feed those 5-7 paintballs. This adds to the noise level considerably if you are shooting paintballs one at a time at an intended target. As stated above the loader does not run when you are not firing so it will work well if you have the need to sneak up on someone in a woodsball game for example.

Overall:

Overall the Pinokio is a great simple hopper and can hold more than any other hopper on the market. It's strengths include its simple foolproof operation and huge capacity options while its weaknesses include its bigger profile and "ugly" look according to some players. Sadly one of the main reasons the Pinokio is overlooked is because of its unique shape when compared to the other loaders on the market. Without a doubt the Nokio is a fantastic option for any player looking for a superloader.


Empire Prophecy 2.0 loader analysis:

The Prophecy is essentially a Halo styled loader on steroids. While its design might resemble the Halo's, the Prophecy is better than the Halo line in every way. The prophecy comes with a magnetic lid which uses a total of three magnets to make opening and closing a breeze, it also comes with a standard nose piece which holds 240 rounds (a 200 round nose piece and 280 round piece is available for separate purchase.) The Prophecy is a popular loader and is used by several professional teams as well as countless paintball players alike. The 2nd version of the Prophecy (2.0) comes with an upgraded drive belt as well as an aluminum feedneck insert which makes the feedneck more durable.

Ball capacity:

The ball capacity of the Prophecy varies as there are three different shell sizes that can attach to the loader. The small shell (200 round front piece) holds a total of around 190 paintballs, the standard sized shell (240 round front piece) holds 220 paintballs, and the large shell (280 round front piece) holds about 260 paintballs. The ability to switch these shells instantaneously adds to the versatility of this superloader. Nose pieces can be switched out in just a few seconds.

Weight:

The standard Prophecy weighs in at 1 pound 4 ounces empty and with 220 paintballs inside it will weigh around 2 pounds 15 ounces. With the small shell attached the Prophecy will weigh about 1 pound 3 ounces empty and 2 pounds 6 ounces full (190 paintballs). The Prophecy with the large nose attached will weigh about 1 pound 5 ounces empty and 2 pounds 15 ounces full (260 paintballs).

Height/width/length:

The height of the Prophecy is 5 ½ inches high from the bottom the feedneck to its highest point. Since the different shells of the prophecy attach below the highest point then this height remains the same for all three size shells. This loader is 4 ½ inches wide and this also remains the same for all three shells. The length of a stock Prophecy (240 ball capacity) is 9 inches and is roughly 10 inches long with the smaller shell attached (200 ball capacity). With the longer shell (280 ball capacity) the Prophecy is about 12 inches long

Batteries/efficiency:

The prophecy uses 4 AA batteries and gets about 6-10 cases with them making it the least battery efficient of the three superloaders. When comparing battery cost the Prophecy also comes in third place at costing 0.000220 cents to feed each shot (assuming an average price of $3.50 for 4 AA's). There is also an upgrade harness available that allows the prophecy to run on two 9 volt batteries rather than the 4 AA's.

Available settings:

The Prophecy has the most available settings of the three superloaders which include 6 different sound sensitivity settings, 6 different speed settings, ball stack monitoring, as well as RF capability. The Prophecy is a sound activated loader in its standard set up. It also can be fed by the touch of a button to check if it is feeding paintballs correctly. The ball stack tension is adjusted by magnets in the drive wheel, having more magnets means having more ball stack tension and having fewer magnets will likewise decrease ball stack tension. The combination of all these settings make the Prophecy a loader that can be made to specifically work very well with any marker set up.

Ease of taking it apart/cleaning it/changing batteries:

The Prophecy has the distinct ability to be broken down all the way with absolutely no tools needed. This makes cleaning the inside of the loader out a breeze and changing batteries is hardly a complicated task. The trick with the Prophecy is making sure everything goes back the same way it was taken apart. The Prophecy can be a little difficult to reassemble but it is nothing that a little practice and manual reading can't fix. Bear in mind that after learning the entire process it still takes a few minutes to attach most of the loader's body. Simon's helpful videos should give you an idea of how the Prophecy comes apart and is put back together, this is part 1 of his disassembly vid:

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTbglbC7uqs"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=WTbglbC7uqs[/url]

Feed rate:

The Prophecy can feed paintballs at an impressive rate of 35+ bps. Part of how this speed is achieved is by a double tiered feeding wheel which constantly lines up several paintballs to be fed into the marker.

Price:

The Prophecy retails from around 110 to 130 dollars brand new making it the least expensive of the three superloaders. Used Prophecies usually go for around 80 to 100 dollars.

Colors:

The Prophecy comes in a decent amount of colors but matching your Prophecy to your gun can be difficult. The main colors of the Prophecy are black and smoke (transparent) which can have either red, blue, or green accents. All colored accent kits as well as the smoke color option gives you the ability to see how many balls are left in your loader. Only the black shells and matching black accents are not transparent.

Aftermarket accessories:

There are many accessories for the Empire Prophecy which include different back plates, changeable accent color kits, different capacity noses as stated above, as well as a choice of either the Empire speedfeed made for the loader or a Virtue Crown. You can also upgrade your Prophecy to a "Prophecy LTD" (the more expenisve version of the loader) by purchasing an upgrade kit which gives you even more options to customize your loader's settings as well as being able to adjust the settings on a computer via USB.

Reball compatibility:

Overall Prophecies tend to accept Reballs very well. Mike's video of shooting 5 pods of Reballs had no jams whatsoever just like the Pinokio Reball test video:

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0AMmyY_IUc8"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=0AMmyY_IUc8[/url]

Durability:

Prophecies have very flexible shells especially when compared to the other two superloaders which allows them to withstand a great amount of abuse. See Simon's video below:

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5Eic0abJtA"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=G5Eic0abJtA[/url]

Despite the flexibility of the shells they have been known to crack on some occasions but this is usually due to extreme use.

Tendency to jam:

Like the Pinokio, the Prophecy overall does not jam very often and even if it does the rip drive is just waiting there underneath the hopper begging to be taken for a spin.

Ball detection system:

The Prophecy is the only sound activated superloader but does have the ability to used through radio frequency activation.

Rip drive:

The Prophecy is the only loader of the three that has rip drive capability and it comes standard on the loader. This obviously allows you to stay in the game and keep firing if your batteries should die right in the heat of battle and aids in clearing jams.

Position of feedneck in regards to the marker:

The Prophecy sweeps back a grand total of 5 inches from the feedneck making it well centered over the marker.

Noise:

Like all three superloaders the Prophecy is quiet and does not spin at all when not feeding a marker. Bear in mind that since it is a sound activated loader other sounds might cause it to start feeding such as a nearby marker firing or being hit against a hard surface.

Overall:

The Prophecy is an excellent choice for players who love options and are concerned about tuning their loader perfectly to their marker. Since both of the other two superloaders have no settings at all, the Prophecy dominates that category. With the option of getting a used Prophecy for a very low price this loader makes a great choice for players who want a superloader but may not have much to spend on one.

Edited by Jweb, 17 February 2011 - 01:36 PM.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#2 Jweb

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 10:52 PM

Dye Rotor loader analysis:

Let me introduce you to our last of the three superloaders. The first generation of the Dye Rotor hit the market in 2008. Two more "generations" have been made since which featured two separate improvements. The 2nd generation included two battery straps in order to keep the batteries from being shaken loose and the 3rd generation included both the battery straps as well as an extended "shark fin" on the center arm in order to make jams easier to fix with a simple pull of the trigger located under the loader. The Rotor is by far the most popular of the three superloaders and part of that has to do with the fact that it is made by Dye, also that the Rotor's shape is often touted as being the sexiest of all other loaders available. Like the prophecy it is also an extremely popular choice for professional teams.

Ball capacity:

The Rotor loader carries approximately 185 paintballs inside its sleek design. This is lower than the other two superloaders but one could argue that its low profile is the cause of its smaller capacity. There is a higher shell attachment available for the Rotor which will increase its capacity to around 250 paintballs, although this does obviously add to the loader's height.

Weight:

The Dye Rotor weighs 1.3 pounds when empty and 2.7 pounds when packed with those 185 paintballs.

Height/width/length:

Now we get down to what the Rotor is known for and that is its very small profile. This loader is only 5 1/2 inches high (from bottom of feedneck to the highest point) and 4 1/4 inches wide at its widest point. The rotor has a total length of 9 inches. Because of this small profile the Rotor is very popular with front players or those who desire their loader to be as small a target as possible. While these measurements are strikingly similar to the Prophecy's own measurements, the Rotor is more rounded than the Prophecy thus making its profile slightly smaller. In actuality, the Prophecy and the Rotor are nearly identical when comparing profiles.

Batteries/efficiency:

According to Dye the Rotor has an impressive shot count of 50,000 shots or 25 cases on only 3 AA batteries. This makes it the second most efficient loader behind the Pinokio. When taking a look at actual battery cost the Rotor is the best with costing a minimal 0.000052 cents per shot (assuming the average price of $2.61 for 3 AA's)

Available settings:

The Rotor is a simple push button loader with basically no real settings to adjust. It is possible to adjust the ball stack tension via a screw underneath the motor. Adjusting the tension of the Rotor will help to prevent jams if a Rotor is experiencing trouble with jamming issues. Other than that the Rotor is either on or off as indicated by its bright blue LED power button.

Ease of taking it apart/cleaning it/changing batteries:

Another reason why the Rotor is highly acclaimed is the fact that it is incredibly easy to take apart. The Rotor can be stripped all the way down to the removal of the gearbox in mere seconds by removing the top half of the loader, followed by the ball tray and then the carousel and center arm with ease. This makes the Rotor very easy to clean should a ball break inside as well as making it easier to run diagnostics should you encounter a problem. Changing the batteries is easily accomplished by simply removing them once the ball tray has been taken out.

Feed rate:

The Rotor is supposedly the fastest loader on the market at 50+ balls per second according to Dye, this high feed rate is made possible by the unique carousel and center arm design inside the loader. Since the carousel spins one direction with the center arm spinning in the opposite direction it is possible to spit paintballs out very quickly.

Check out this stunning video by Dye on the Rotor's feed rate:

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juzwsBimSrY"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=juzwsBimSrY[/url]

Price:

Let me say that Rotors aren't cheap and sitting at around $169.95 brand new makes them the most expensive loader on the market, used Rotors usually go from anywhere between 90 and 120 dollars. Bear in mind that since there have been 3 generations of Rotors that it is possible to pick up an older generation for less but you may be opening yourself up to potential jamming issues that plagued many of the earlier Rotors.

Colors:

The Rotor comes in a vast array of colors from olive green to liquid red and can match practically every marker on the market. In addition there are numerous accessory kits that feature even more colors which can allow you to mix and match your Rotor's personality. The colored windows on the back of the Rotor are advertised as being an easy way to check the paint level but they hardly work because the Rotor is sealed up very well and it is usually too dark inside to see how many paintballs are left.

Aftermarket accessories:

There are several accessories that can either make your Rotor perform better or make it look cooler. Some of these accessories include the Virtue Rotor soft cycle arm which can more gentle on paint, upgraded boards, the bigger capacity shell, as well as several kinds of speedfeeds like the Exalt Feedgate, Virtue Crown, and the KM Spine.

Reball compatibility:

Once again in Mike's video there are absolutely no jams with 5 pods of reballs through the Dye Rotor. Needless to say that there is no guarantee that reballs will not jam in your Rotor as it is stated in the manual to not use reballs with it. When it comes to reballs, Rotors are certainly not considered the loader of choice.

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiFLcdaJxTE"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=uiFLcdaJxTE[/url]

Durability:

The Rotor is known for being durable and taking quite a beating both on speedball and woodsball fields alike. Cracked shells like those sometimes found on Prophecies are rarely found on Dye Rotors. The Rotor feels much more solid than the other two loaders which is due to the reinforced plastic. Watch this vid, need I say more?

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdqKg0PIXfY"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=XdqKg0PIXfY[/url]

Tendency to jam:

Earlier generations of the Dye Rotor were prone to jams especially when used with inferior to low grade paint. The third generation Rotor has a significantly better track record than it's previous generations and overall performs much better even with iffy paint. Out of all three superloaders the Rotor probably tends to jam the most which is due to its unusual center arm and carousel design which can get jammed with bad paint. Interestingly it seems that the feature of being able to feed balls very quickly (due to the carousel/center arm design) is one of the main reasons why it jams more, almost like the Rotor may be too fast for its own good.

Ball detection system:

The Rotor has no eyes and is not a sound activated loader. The loader spins continuously until it senses tension in the ball stack via a microswitch which will then cause it to stop spinning and feed only when it needs to. This can be an easy indicator as to when you need to feed more balls as if you hear your Rotor spinning away then it's time to shove another pod in there.

Rip Drive:

The Rotor has no rip drive nor is one available to be installed. Arguably the Rotor doesn't exactly need a rip drive as a simple pull of the bottom trigger is usually all that is needed to clear jams and get back in the game. Please note that the pull trigger merely reverses the loader arm and does not feed paintballs but is only intended to clear a jam should one occur.

Position of feedneck in regards to Gun:

The Rotor has a low profile and does not sweep back too far from the feedneck. The loader comes back 4 and ¾ inches from the back part of the feedneck to the very end of the loader.

Noise:

The Rotor is also known for its quietness and can be the choice of many woodsballers who prefer to be silent in the woods. This is most likely due to the reinforced shell which does an excellent job of dampening the running noise. According to Dye, excess dirt and dust can cause the Rotor to perform with more noise so a very clean Rotor is a quiet Rotor.

Overall:

The Dye Rotor is overall a fantastic loader but as stated it can be a bit expensive and can be out of reach for most budget to intermediate paintballers. Two extra features that the Rotor has is a very nice lid which is easily opened and closed as well as a spring loaded feed tray which helps to dump balls into the carousel once the loader starts to run low on ammunition. IMO it is never worth it to purchase a Rotor brand new as you can get them for much cheaper when previously used.

As a last point of reference here is Mike's Superloader show which does a great job of comparing the three loaders:


[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4RpklaSSTQ"]http://www.youtube.c...h?v=F4RpklaSSTQ[/url]

So that's it...

There you have it, a detailed look at the three superloaders. Let me say in closing that this report took about 2 months of hard research to put together but i think it was well worth it to someone looking into one of these loaders. Each superloader has clearly earned its place and each does something better than the other two. A huge thanks to Mike for putting together the superloader show and providing the backbone for this report. Thank you and hope you enjoyed the analysis! TechPB to the front!

Edited by Jweb, 11 February 2011 - 09:48 PM.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#3 iReLapse

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 10:54 PM

Holy shit stickyyy

First! now my life is complete haha

Edited by iReLapse, 23 January 2011 - 10:54 PM.

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#4 Justbunkeredyou

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 11:04 PM

Looks like a sticky.


#5 pizimp

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Posted 23 January 2011 - 11:47 PM

sniff sniff i smell a sticky

sniff sniff i smell a sticky
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Its like a dirty crack head rubbing crack dust over his body and humping a gigantic crack rock....

Buying your upped guns

#6 fiveten15093

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 12:12 AM

Great Job!
In the past couple of years we've seen companies disappear, we've seen teams fall apart, we've seen leagues fail. But we've also seen players humbly return to their "family" teams after enjoying a paid ride of being a hired gun by the highest bidder. We've seen industry gurus come back to the sport after selling off everything they worked so hard to build, only to start over again fresh and new. We've seen this sport suffer along with every other industry due to the current economic conditions, and yet we've seen survival.


#7 Plattypus

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 12:13 AM

Wow, extremely detailed!

Stickylolglue.

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#8 RADO

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 12:17 AM

sticky

#9 Rollieelmo

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 12:39 AM

Ahhh, the smell of stickies in the morning. Excellent revied sir. Have you owned all the loaders? (Just curious)
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#10 Jweb

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 12:47 AM

Ahhh, the smell of stickies in the morning. Excellent revied sir. Have you owned all the loaders? (Just curious)


Oh yes, I currently own and love all three. The trick is deciding which one to use when I go to the field.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#11 maxyboy911

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 02:59 AM

sticky

#12 UnspeakablePat

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 10:01 AM

SUPER in depth, I call to sticky this big time!
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#13 Jakkems

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 10:42 AM

great comparision-thanks!

#14 Antonious

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 10:55 AM

Definitely a sticky. One problem though. In the Pinokio section, you mentioned the ability to visually tell how much paint you have left in the loader. However, you left that small bit out of the Prophecy's and the Rotor's sections.

For me, this was a big selling point when I bought my Prophecy because it had a big enough window in the back to allow me to easily see at a glance how much paint I had left (unlike the Rotor) but offered a solid black nose so my opponents couldn't see my brightly colored paintballs (unlike the 'Nokio).

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#15 Pokey

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 12:12 PM

This is great
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I am under 18 and pay for all my gear.

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#16 Jweb

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 03:36 PM

Definitely a sticky. One problem though. In the Pinokio section, you mentioned the ability to visually tell how much paint you have left in the loader. However, you left that small bit out of the Prophecy's and the Rotor's sections.

For me, this was a big selling point when I bought my Prophecy because it had a big enough window in the back to allow me to easily see at a glance how much paint I had left (unlike the Rotor) but offered a solid black nose so my opponents couldn't see my brightly colored paintballs (unlike the 'Nokio).


Bingo, I'll be sure to include that in there.

Glad you guys like the analysis, sure was fun to put together.

Edit: All fixed, thanks for the tip.

Edited by Jweb, 24 January 2011 - 03:44 PM.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#17 xmagman

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 04:30 PM

Great post! Really in depth and this should be referenced whenever somebody is requesting loader info in the VS threads. <BR><BR>However, I just want to point out a couple&nbsp;small things...Actual ball capacities on these loaders is often less than what is advertised. Sure, you could put that many paintballs in there but the loader will most likely jam or just not feed. So, if I may make the suggestion of counting out the paintballs that each will hold and still feed. The other is ACTUAL feedrates of the loaders. I know that 50+ bps feedrate does not matter in the real world but it seems to matter to some folks. I have yet to see ANY loader feed as fast as the manufacturer says it does. So maybe putting the marker on uncapped ramp with the loader on optimal settings/conditions (fresh batteries and best speed settings) would give a realistic idea of actual on-gun feed rates. <BR><BR>Also, on the Prophecy you forgot to mention the VICI board that is available. <BR><BR>I know you spent a ton of time on this mega-review so if you don't take my suggestions I wont be hurt (I can take it...I'm a big boy). But if you could do that and update the review it would be great. <BR><BR>Again, thanks for all of your hard work and time!

Edited by xmagman, 24 January 2011 - 04:32 PM.

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#18 Jweb

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 05:07 PM

Great post! Really in depth and this should be referenced whenever somebody is requesting loader info in the VS threads. <BR><BR>However, I just want to point out a couple&nbsp;small things...Actual ball capacities on these loaders is often less than what is advertised. Sure, you could put that many paintballs in there but the loader will most likely jam or just not feed. So, if I may make the suggestion of counting out the paintballs that each will hold and still feed. The other is ACTUAL feedrates of the loaders. I know that 50+ bps feedrate does not matter in the real world but it seems to matter to some folks. I have yet to see ANY loader feed as fast as the manufacturer says it does. So maybe putting the marker on uncapped ramp with the loader on optimal settings/conditions (fresh batteries and best speed settings) would give a realistic idea of actual on-gun feed rates. <BR><BR>Also, on the Prophecy you forgot to mention the VICI board that is available. <BR><BR>I know you spent a ton of time on this mega-review so if you don't take my suggestions I wont be hurt (I can take it...I'm a big boy). But if you could do that and update the review it would be great. <BR><BR>Again, thanks for all of your hard work and time!


Most of the ball capacities came from actual video reviews of the loaders so I'm hoping they aren't that far off. I could count them out just to be absolutely sure though. I included the feeding rates as more of a reference tool as obviously all three loaders will feed faster than you would ever need them to, as for actually testing it out on a marker I don't think I own any markers that have uncapped ramping so I'll have to find a way to get those statistics. Thanks for the suggestions!

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#19 PBJUNKEY

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 05:44 PM

im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio

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#20 Snake-Eyes

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 07:25 PM

sticky i love my nokio
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#21 LikeACheeseStick

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 07:58 PM

I think someone deserves a stick :}

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#22 Antonious

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 07:59 PM

im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?

Edited by Antonious, 24 January 2011 - 08:02 PM.

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#23 LikeACheeseStick

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 08:19 PM


Ahhh, the smell of stickies in the morning. Excellent revied sir. Have you owned all the loaders? (Just curious)


Oh yes, I currently own and love all three. The trick is deciding which one to use when I go to the field.



Bring them ALL! :D

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#24 Jweb

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 10:26 PM


im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?



Indeed, if you are looking at battery cost then you get more bang for you're buck with the Rotor.

Edited by Jweb, 24 January 2011 - 10:27 PM.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#25 Jweb

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 10:29 PM



Ahhh, the smell of stickies in the morning. Excellent revied sir. Have you owned all the loaders? (Just curious)


Oh yes, I currently own and love all three. The trick is deciding which one to use when I go to the field.



Bring them ALL! Posted Image


I really wish I could, I'd switch them out each game. The only issue is that I don't go to any fields where I can leave my bag in the car so someone could just walk off with them.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#26 Pakistani

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 10:48 PM


im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?

if not for cost, why does battery efficiency matter?

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#27 Jweb

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Posted 24 January 2011 - 11:31 PM



im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?

if not for cost, why does battery efficiency matter?


I would think to get an idea of just how many paintballs you can shoot before the batteries run dead. For example, if I'm using my Prophecy which gets 6-10 cases on 4 AA's then I am more likely to carry 4 batteries in my gear bag then if I am 7 cases into using my Pinokio which gets 30 cases on fresh bats.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#28 Pakistani

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 01:11 AM




im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?

if not for cost, why does battery efficiency matter?


I would think to get an idea of just how many paintballs you can shoot before the batteries run dead. For example, if I'm using my Prophecy which gets 6-10 cases on 4 AA's then I am more likely to carry 4 batteries in my gear bag then if I am 7 cases into using my Pinokio which gets 30 cases on fresh bats.

i follow that aspect, but i feel like thats a non-issue.
other than inconvenience of actually having to change the batteries, battery life is fairly trivial thing to compare hoppers on.
that is, of course, unless you bring in the cost factor that goes along with batteries as thats a real, practical reason to have better battery life over shitty battery life.

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#29 Antonious

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 01:25 AM





im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?

if not for cost, why does battery efficiency matter?


I would think to get an idea of just how many paintballs you can shoot before the batteries run dead. For example, if I'm using my Prophecy which gets 6-10 cases on 4 AA's then I am more likely to carry 4 batteries in my gear bag then if I am 7 cases into using my Pinokio which gets 30 cases on fresh bats.

i follow that aspect, but i feel like thats a non-issue.
other than inconvenience of actually having to change the batteries, battery life is fairly trivial thing to compare hoppers on.
that is, of course, unless you bring in the cost factor that goes along with batteries as thats a real, practical reason to have better battery life over shitty battery life.


One could argue the same concept about a hopper's feed rate since 99% of fields don't allow anything over 15 bps, yet everybody seems to pitch a tent when they hear about the Rotor's ability to feed "ZOMG 50+!!!"

I agree, battery life is not a major selling point but nowhere in the thread was it mentioned as such. The OP noticed there were a few differences between the loaders concerning this aspect and thought it was worthy enough to be mentioned. Also, this isn't really a comparison thread, rather a detailed review on each loader where the reader can form his own opinions.

Besides, I would rather be OVER-educated when investing that much in a loader rather than find a few unfortunate surprises after the fact because somebody else thought it was too trivial to mention.

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#30 PBJUNKEY

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 07:47 AM

[quote name='Pakistani' date='25 January 2011 - 12:11 AM' timestamp='1295935900' post='1972207']
[/quote]

[/quote]
i follow that aspect, but i feel like thats a non-issue.
other than inconvenience of actually having to change the batteries, battery life is fairly trivial thing to compare hoppers on.
that is, of course, unless you bring in the cost factor that goes along with batteries as thats a real, practical reason to have better battery life over shitty battery life.
[/quote]

battery effeciency was one of the major selling points to me when i bought my loader

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#31 Jweb

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 11:32 AM





im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?

if not for cost, why does battery efficiency matter?


I would think to get an idea of just how many paintballs you can shoot before the batteries run dead. For example, if I'm using my Prophecy which gets 6-10 cases on 4 AA's then I am more likely to carry 4 batteries in my gear bag then if I am 7 cases into using my Pinokio which gets 30 cases on fresh bats.

i follow that aspect, but i feel like thats a non-issue.
other than inconvenience of actually having to change the batteries, battery life is fairly trivial thing to compare hoppers on.
that is, of course, unless you bring in the cost factor that goes along with batteries as thats a real, practical reason to have better battery life over shitty battery life.


That's a valid point, I'll make a note to include that in the analysis.

The analysis now reflects those calculations. Assuming the average cost of the batteries used for each loader the numbers are:

Rotor - 0.000052 cents per shot
Pinokio - 0.000083 cents per shot
Prophecy - 0.000220 cents per shot

Prophecy obviously still comes in third place but the Rotor wins when looking at actual battery cost and cost per shot (simply because AA batteries are cheaper than 9 volts).

Edited by Jweb, 25 January 2011 - 12:03 PM.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#32 Crashkt90

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 04:20 PM

I dont believe the 40+ bps on the rotor because i have yet to see a video that isnt by dye to make it do that.

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#33 PBJUNKEY

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 04:40 PM






im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?

if not for cost, why does battery efficiency matter?


I would think to get an idea of just how many paintballs you can shoot before the batteries run dead. For example, if I'm using my Prophecy which gets 6-10 cases on 4 AA's then I am more likely to carry 4 batteries in my gear bag then if I am 7 cases into using my Pinokio which gets 30 cases on fresh bats.

i follow that aspect, but i feel like thats a non-issue.
other than inconvenience of actually having to change the batteries, battery life is fairly trivial thing to compare hoppers on.
that is, of course, unless you bring in the cost factor that goes along with batteries as thats a real, practical reason to have better battery life over shitty battery life.


That's a valid point, I'll make a note to include that in the analysis.

The analysis now reflects those calculations. Assuming the average cost of the batteries used for each loader the numbers are:

Rotor - 0.000052 cents per shot
Pinokio - 0.000083 cents per shot
Prophecy - 0.000220 cents per shot

Prophecy obviously still comes in third place but the Rotor wins when looking at actual battery cost and cost per shot (simply because AA batteries are cheaper than 9 volts).

yay someone understands

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#34 RADO

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 06:41 PM

honestly why has this not been sticked yet? it has everything about all the loaders mentioned.

#35 Cheeyahboii

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 06:57 PM

This should be stickied and also you forgot that they're giving the pinokio a more sleeker look to in the near future.
The new look of the pinokio is almost like a rotor kind of look except with the detachable cone of course.

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#36 PBSL Carmen

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 08:38 PM

How does each loader affect the balance of a gun? Are Pinokios and Prophecies inclined to tip back further than a Rotor? I'm used to the extremes (Eggy 2) but would like to take this into consideration when I buy used.
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#37 Jweb

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 09:04 PM

This should be stickied and also you forgot that they're giving the pinokio a more sleeker look to in the near future.
The new look of the pinokio is almost like a rotor kind of look except with the detachable cone of course.


I specifically didn't mention it because nobody knows for sure when it is coming out nor what it will actually look like. I have a feeling that it might be different enough that I should be able to add on to this report rather than erasing all the current Pinokio stats.

How does each loader affect the balance of a gun? Are Pinokios and Prophecies inclined to tip back further than a Rotor? I'm used to the extremes (Eggy 2) but would like to take this into consideration when I buy used.


Obviously each of the three superloaders will affect the balance differently on every single marker. For example if I have my Pinokio on my FX it tends to make the marker back heavy, but if it is on my BT-4 Combat then it feels much more balanced.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#38 walrus27

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 09:05 PM




im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?

if not for cost, why does battery efficiency matter?


Dude just so you know, I requested for your thread to be pinned. I didn't get it :(

I would think to get an idea of just how many paintballs you can shoot before the batteries run dead. For example, if I'm using my Prophecy which gets 6-10 cases on 4 AA's then I am more likely to carry 4 batteries in my gear bag then if I am 7 cases into using my Pinokio which gets 30 cases on fresh bats.


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#39 larryjerry1

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 09:11 PM

dare i say it?

...

sticky.

but seriously though. this is an amazing post. while i had already seen mike's video and knew pretty much everything in this post already, for the people who don't know and are thinking about one of these loaders, this is a Godsend. this is easily one of the best threads on a loader i've seen. come on techpb, sticky this already! we all know it's gonna happen

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#40 Calculus Master

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 12:08 AM

While I know Mike had no problems with reballs when he tested all of the hoppers, I play reball exclusively and the pinokio has far fewer problems than either the rotor or the prophecy. Even though Mike "conditioned" his reballs, there is a difference between his conditioned reballs, and field reballs that are shot and stepped on all day. In the reball category the pinokio is definately better. Otherwise, great analysis.

#41 Pakistani

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 02:36 AM






im not trying to be a jerk here and you are right about battery efficency im just pointing something out.

how much do a pack of like 9(i think thats what they come in) AA duracells cost and how much does two 9 volt duracells cost?
They both cost around 5$. and off of 5 bucks worth of batterys with the rotor you can get 75 cases and 30 with the pinokio


The battery efficiency he's talking about refers only to how long one set of batteries lasts in the loader before you need to change them, not the cost efficiency of the batteries themselves. So the 'Nokio wins.

That's similar to comparing the air efficiency of a 98 custom and an Ego. With the budget for an Ego, you can buy a 98 custom and an ungodly amount of air refills (free air at fields is not considered in this comparison). So since you can buy more air with the extra amount of money left over from the 98 custom, does that mean the 98 custom is more air efficient than an Ego?

if not for cost, why does battery efficiency matter?


I would think to get an idea of just how many paintballs you can shoot before the batteries run dead. For example, if I'm using my Prophecy which gets 6-10 cases on 4 AA's then I am more likely to carry 4 batteries in my gear bag then if I am 7 cases into using my Pinokio which gets 30 cases on fresh bats.

i follow that aspect, but i feel like thats a non-issue.
other than inconvenience of actually having to change the batteries, battery life is fairly trivial thing to compare hoppers on.
that is, of course, unless you bring in the cost factor that goes along with batteries as thats a real, practical reason to have better battery life over shitty battery life.


That's a valid point, I'll make a note to include that in the analysis.

The analysis now reflects those calculations. Assuming the average cost of the batteries used for each loader the numbers are:

Rotor - 0.000052 cents per shot
Pinokio - 0.000083 cents per shot
Prophecy - 0.000220 cents per shot

Prophecy obviously still comes in third place but the Rotor wins when looking at actual battery cost and cost per shot (simply because AA batteries are cheaper than 9 volts).

glad you understood my point.
not sure why people dont understand battery efficiency is really only relevant when cost is brought into the equation

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#42 Jweb

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 01:19 PM

glad you understood my point.
not sure why people dont understand battery efficiency is really only relevant when cost is brought into the equation


Probably because when most people think about how many shots the loader can get they tend to not look at the actual cost of the batteries involved, just the fact that it can feed "X" cases of paint before it dies. I myself had to think about it a little while before coming to the conclusion that other than cost there isn't really any other tangible aspect to it like you said.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#43 Hebiki

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 02:30 PM

Besides, I would rather be OVER-educated when investing that much in a loader rather than find a few unfortunate surprises after the fact because somebody else thought it was too trivial to mention.


quoted for emphasis. :D

JWeb: great work!

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#44 Jweb

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 04:03 PM


Besides, I would rather be OVER-educated when investing that much in a loader rather than find a few unfortunate surprises after the fact because somebody else thought it was too trivial to mention.


quoted for emphasis. Posted Image

JWeb: great work!


Thank you sir. It certainly was a pleasure putting it together.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#45 PBJUNKEY

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 05:33 PM

went to the store today and it costs 6$ for 6 AA and $6 for 2 Nine volts but you would still get more shots with 6 AA's

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#46 Rotozip2

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Posted 08 February 2011 - 05:21 PM

did someone step in a big steaming pile of sticky?

I never get wipers, blood is hard to wipe off.


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#47 Mayo88

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 07:15 PM

1.Rotor
2.Ponokio
3.Prophecy
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#48 Sixxxer

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 11:34 AM

Awesome info, this should deserve a sticky. Helped me decide between the 3 loaders.

#49 Jweb

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 11:48 AM

Awesome info, this should deserve a sticky. Helped me decide between the 3 loaders.


Glad it helped. Yeah unfortunately it never got stickied.

I kind of like neck shots, they give other people the impression that I have a social life.

Meeting Mike and Willie = best paintball day ever.


#50 brokeballr14

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 04:34 PM

it should be <_<
THE GAME




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