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High School Paintball Help


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#1 sl66

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 01:15 PM

So guys...Im a sophmore and I want to start a high school team! I know the procedures and I have no clue how im going to request funding when im always in the office in trouble. Maybe i dont know the exact procedures.
Help Please!!!!!!

#2 EHz

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 09:17 AM

Don't go to administration, simple as that. Our principal was fine with the idea of having a club, but the guy in charge of clubs claimed he knew everything about paintball (despite his obvious lack of understanding) and told us no. We went up to him professionally with a folder we prepared containing bi-laws and everything else a legitimate club on campus needed. We had other clubs actually help us out with this to make sure there were no loopholes that we'd miss, then went out and collected 300+ signatures. He glanced at the paperwork and said he'd "think" about it. We found him a week later once we figured he was avoiding us and after a long winded speech (20mins about liability and such, lots of repetition), he told us no. So we gathered some people and started a group anyway. Relying on the school for funding is a bad idea anyway, especially since they basically control any money your club collects or spends.

#3 invictus

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 10:25 PM

they won't give you funding, but starting a high school club will help the sport grow, first you need to write an essay describing the sport, something like this:

The first game of paintball was played in May of 1981, between two friends, Charles Gaines and Hayes Noel, over an argument of which one of them was better at surviving in the wilderness. Since then the game has evolved into a worldwide sport of more than 12 million players in more than 100 countries, with organized leagues, and professional teams. But unlike most other sports, you donít have to be on a team to play paintball, or even know how to play paintball, anyone, age 10 to 100, male or female, can go to their local field, rent equipment, and just play paintball with everyone else at the field.
Paintball is statistically one of the safest sports people can play; most injuries are the same injuries as cross-country running. The reasons that a sport with projectiles being shot at 300 feet per second is so safe, are the simple safety rules strictly kept on the field: while playing, keep your mask on, and while not playing, keep your barrel covered. The paintball mask can take hundreds of shots at 325 feet per second, more than the limit, keeping the eyes of the player completely protected. The barrel cover is placed over the barrel, and keeps any accidental shots in the barrel, keeping the rest areas completely safe.
Although paintball seems to be a sport based around shooting people, there is much more to it. Paintball promotes teamwork, and helps self confidence. Every good paintball team has a good leader to train the team, register the team for events, and write out the plays that will let his team win. Every good paintball team has good communication between the players, to know where everyone is on the field, and help with equipment problems off the field. Every good paintball player is physically fit, and ready to do whatever it takes to make his team win.

then give a description of what you would do as a club, where you would go, how often, how you would get there. it's not easy. but it's possible.

#4 Ny Slim

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Posted 18 May 2012 - 11:26 PM

they won't give you funding, but starting a high school club will help the sport grow, first you need to write an essay describing the sport, something like this:

The first game of paintball was played in May of 1981, between two friends, Charles Gaines and Hayes Noel, over an argument of which one of them was better at surviving in the wilderness. Since then the game has evolved into a worldwide sport of more than 12 million players in more than 100 countries, with organized leagues, and professional teams. But unlike most other sports, you donít have to be on a team to play paintball, or even know how to play paintball, anyone, age 10 to 100, male or female, can go to their local field, rent equipment, and just play paintball with everyone else at the field.
Paintball is statistically one of the safest sports people can play; most injuries are the same injuries as cross-country running. The reasons that a sport with projectiles being shot at 300 feet per second is so safe, are the simple safety rules strictly kept on the field: while playing, keep your mask on, and while not playing, keep your barrel covered. The paintball mask can take hundreds of shots at 325 feet per second, more than the limit, keeping the eyes of the player completely protected. The barrel cover is placed over the barrel, and keeps any accidental shots in the barrel, keeping the rest areas completely safe.
Although paintball seems to be a sport based around shooting people, there is much more to it. Paintball promotes teamwork, and helps self confidence. Every good paintball team has a good leader to train the team, register the team for events, and write out the plays that will let his team win. Every good paintball team has good communication between the players, to know where everyone is on the field, and help with equipment problems off the field. Every good paintball player is physically fit, and ready to do whatever it takes to make his team win.

then give a description of what you would do as a club, where you would go, how often, how you would get there. it's not easy. but it's possible.





I like that a lot but I also want to start a team in my school except is the school doesn't really fund towards sports or clubs so therefor making it near impossible to start a team, then in the state of New York you have to be careful with having a paintball gun and Fields for practice are a long distance so I just wait for the day that some law is passed and people understand it's a safe sport.
Aside from that nice introduction to the essay, very well writen and sets a good example for a start.


#5 WiscoBaller

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 05:04 PM

Here is the essay we used to become a club sport at Marquette this year:

Paintball Club Marquette

By John Basich

7 February 2012

Club Sport Application

The current game of paintball traces its lineage to the equipment farmers and other agriculturalists, such as the U.S. Forestry Department, used to mark cattle and trees. The original "markers" as they were known, fired capsules filled with an oil-based paint in order to "mark" a target and make identification easier. The first game of paintball was played among twelve friends in New Hampshire in 1981, and has grown into a worldwide phenomenon. At the professional level, the United States is home to the NPPL (National Professional Paintball League established 1993) and to the PSP (Paintball Sports Promotions established 2002). Europe has the Millennium league (established 1994). Players from the European Millennium league and U.S. players from the NPPL and the PSP regularly play each other in professional tournaments both in the U.S. and throughout Europe, with the culmination of U.S. play at the NPPL World Championship in Las Vegas, Nevada. The NCPA (National Collegiate Paintball Association) holds the National Championship every year, and offers coordinated play between colleges. The organization aids in the implementation of tournaments between colleges through creating standards by which all players and events must adhere.

The equipment of the game has changed substantially from the first game in 1981. Players originally used markers that were pumped after every shot to re-cock and re-load the marker. In the early 1990s Bud Orr and Glenn Palmer introduced the "auto cocking mechanism" to pump guns that brought semi-automatic capabilities to the marker. Paintball was becoming much faster and moved from the woods to sanctioned fields with obstacles and bunkers. The marker eventually became electronic and the game has become faster still. Games last less than five minutes and a player can shoot more than 500 paintballs. Most tournament makers currently consist of an electronic marker, an air tank, and a hopper that stores and loads the paintballs. Air is regulated through two regulators and the velocity of the ball is kept to 300 feet per second and under. Masks are specially designed for the sport and protect the entire face, eyes, nose, mouth, and ears. Players typically wear special jerseys and pants, along with knee and elbow pads that provide padding from the impacts of the balls and the physical nature of play. Cleats provide the best traction during play whether indoor or outdoor. Paintballs are also no longer filled with actual paint, but a fill of food coloring and gelatin that is safe, non-toxic, and biodegradable. "Reballs" are also a common practice medium made out of rubber that are reusable and do not create the mess of real paintballs.

A game of "X Ball" or "Speed Ball" has the fastest game play as well as the most recognition. The major professional leagues (NPPL, PSP, and Millennium) along with the NCPA all promote tournaments using the speed ball format. Up to seven players oppose another team of equal number and compete on a course with inflatable "bunkers" of varying shapes and sizes in order to eliminate the other team and capture the flag in the center of the course. The course is 150 feet by 125 feet, and the games are timed by a referee. Referees are also spaced among the players to call "hits" (the marking of a player by a paintball). Paintball is a safe, well regulated sport that has garnered an international following.

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#6 Ny Slim

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 10:37 PM

Here is the essay we used to become a club sport at Marquette this year:

Paintball Club Marquette

By John Basich

7 February 2012

Club Sport Application

The current game of paintball traces its lineage to the equipment farmers and other agriculturalists, such as the U.S. Forestry Department, used to mark cattle and trees. The original "markers" as they were known, fired capsules filled with an oil-based paint in order to "mark" a target and make identification easier. The first game of paintball was played among twelve friends in New Hampshire in 1981, and has grown into a worldwide phenomenon. At the professional level, the United States is home to the NPPL (National Professional Paintball League established 1993) and to the PSP (Paintball Sports Promotions established 2002). Europe has the Millennium league (established 1994). Players from the European Millennium league and U.S. players from the NPPL and the PSP regularly play each other in professional tournaments both in the U.S. and throughout Europe, with the culmination of U.S. play at the NPPL World Championship in Las Vegas, Nevada. The NCPA (National Collegiate Paintball Association) holds the National Championship every year, and offers coordinated play between colleges. The organization aids in the implementation of tournaments between colleges through creating standards by which all players and events must adhere.

The equipment of the game has changed substantially from the first game in 1981. Players originally used markers that were pumped after every shot to re-cock and re-load the marker. In the early 1990s Bud Orr and Glenn Palmer introduced the "auto cocking mechanism" to pump guns that brought semi-automatic capabilities to the marker. Paintball was becoming much faster and moved from the woods to sanctioned fields with obstacles and bunkers. The marker eventually became electronic and the game has become faster still. Games last less than five minutes and a player can shoot more than 500 paintballs. Most tournament makers currently consist of an electronic marker, an air tank, and a hopper that stores and loads the paintballs. Air is regulated through two regulators and the velocity of the ball is kept to 300 feet per second and under. Masks are specially designed for the sport and protect the entire face, eyes, nose, mouth, and ears. Players typically wear special jerseys and pants, along with knee and elbow pads that provide padding from the impacts of the balls and the physical nature of play. Cleats provide the best traction during play whether indoor or outdoor. Paintballs are also no longer filled with actual paint, but a fill of food coloring and gelatin that is safe, non-toxic, and biodegradable. "Reballs" are also a common practice medium made out of rubber that are reusable and do not create the mess of real paintballs.

A game of "X Ball" or "Speed Ball" has the fastest game play as well as the most recognition. The major professional leagues (NPPL, PSP, and Millennium) along with the NCPA all promote tournaments using the speed ball format. Up to seven players oppose another team of equal number and compete on a course with inflatable "bunkers" of varying shapes and sizes in order to eliminate the other team and capture the flag in the center of the course. The course is 150 feet by 125 feet, and the games are timed by a referee. Referees are also spaced among the players to call "hits" (the marking of a player by a paintball). Paintball is a safe, well regulated sport that has garnered an international following.


Very neatly written, but also besides the essay as the other people posted there are going to probably be legal papers, insurance, and then you have to think about field location, with the paper If this is the whole paper you have to make you to source the information if not good start and I like it so far :tup:

#7 zachpnnc

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 05:42 PM

it would also be good to have a teacher be the coach of the team.

#8 Kikkia

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Posted 26 June 2012 - 05:47 PM

I am starting a club and you shouldn't ask the principle and teachers.
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#9 K1NGofTH3farW3ST

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 06:00 PM

Honestly it's not worth it for me to start a HS pb team for a couple of reasons. For one, not enough (good) players go to my school for anyone to benafit. Two the HS format in the NCPA is just bs, i would rather play straight up xball or nppl than that 600 ball rule. And three, your pretty much (in my eyes) better off joining a team or even starting a beginner team in a local league. Keep in mind thats my oppinion and were all opinionated.

#10 VTcadet

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 03:29 PM

First of all I was successful in starting a High School team, but there is alot that goes into it, it took all four years for me to do it. You will not get funding from the school they most likely wont even help you get anything. You need to first get it approved by the principle and then the athletic director. Then you need a teacher who is willing to sponsor the team by staying after school for meetings. Then you're okay to star the team. If your always getting in trouble i would not start a team through the school because if something happens he is gonna come after you first even if your group didnt do anything. I would most likely just ask for the use of your school mascot and name so you can make jerseys. I also would suggest never brining ANY gear no matter what it is in school Ever! At this point its probably the best idea to just use the name and logo

#11 The Recballer

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Posted 25 September 2013 - 08:23 PM

I am going to my administration very soon about starting a team. All my friends are on board, and we have a person who works at the school that has agreed to be our coach. All we have to do is make it official with the school. Wish me luck.

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#12 III Kezia III

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 04:42 AM

uh it still wont be a team. it would be a club. you cannot be a HS team if you are the only school that has a Paintball "team"


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#13 The Recballer

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 08:07 AM

I guess. But we'd be playing D5 and like two other schools.


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#14 BurningPlaydoh

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 01:49 PM

I suggest not involving your school at all. Put something on facebook to let friends at your school know the team exists but IMO there is really no advantage to including your high school in the equation.

#15 Brum4500

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Posted 11 December 2013 - 05:41 PM

If you have a club at school, you can't not let certain (crappy) people play.  You have to be equal, which is dumb.



#16 Jeramiej22

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 08:41 PM

How is it dumb to not allow exclusion? Its possible that there is students that surpass your skill level naturally but may not have the financial ability to ever find out. Excluding any one on prejudged idea of "how a person might play" is ridiculous.
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