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Building running endurance?


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#1 The Bacon Man

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 11:46 PM

Hello, I'm 13, 110lbs, 5'4". I'm doing football next year.

We had a pre season practice, and one of the things was to run 300 yards. I did it in 58 seconds. 100 yards was fine, 150 was where I felt it, 250 My legs wouldn't move any faster than jogging speed. That was more of a physically "can't move" feeling. A long run gives me a more breathing/internal fatigue.

I want to be a receiver and corner back. I am marginally faster then some of the fastest receivers, but have no endurance (well, ok endurance. Deffidently better than some people)

My goal is to be able to full sprint through 300 yards, and run a mile without stopping.

I will do whatever it takes to do this, just numbers but it would be a huge accomplishment.

I play football with my friends 4-7 days of the week, from 2-5 hours each day. On top of that, I want to try to run everyday.

I want to start out with a full on sprint until I physically feel like I can't move. Then take a 10 minute break, and run as long as I can at a steady speed.

Is that good? What other things would you recommend/correct? Also are wind sprints good for speed?

#2 kingJurzy

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 11:58 PM

Interval running. Running a mile without stopping is not hard, just tell yourself that you will not stop. I am not skinny, nor am I fat, I am about 15 pounds overweight (thank god for summer to fix that) and I am usually the 1-4th person to finish the mile with a class of about 100.

Fastest time was 6:32

I want to start out with a full on sprint until I physically feel like I can't move. Then take a 10 minute break, and run as long as I can at a steady speed.

This sounds good, but once you start to go over your limit, do not stop, just keep it at a light jog, then when you feel better sprint again.




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#3 Dak-Attack

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 12:24 AM

You can try the couch to 5k program.


#4 Eskimo

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Posted 24 June 2012 - 12:03 PM

Alright, there is alot to go over. So im going to ignore the Diet portion of the speech (Which BTW is like 80% of getting better at anything. What you eat is Crucial to your performance on any given day)

Generally when you want to build endurance the way you do. what your looking for is to improve your Resistance To fatigue. Becuase lets face it, you can sprint full tilt for 10 seconds... but then you....start... to......slow..........down.

So. How do you make that 10 seconds become 11? Or 12? 13? what ABOUT 14?

3 things are going to be key:

1: The Muscle in your Heart, the stronger this is. The less it has to work. Which in turn means you can work just as hard. for longer.

2: Your Body's ability to Move Blood to your muscles. Obviously your legs are going full tilt. but even if your heart is the strongest thing in the world. there is no use if you only have a few VERY TINY Capillaries letting 1 blood cell, to transfer 1 molecule of oxygen to an entire section of the muscle at a time. You basically get a traffic jam effect. where you have lots of blood getting shoved into a small vein. which ends up just being as slow as the amount of "lanes" the blood can travel through.

3: Your bodys Ability to physically USE the oxygen you have, If you breath in. And breath out. Somewhere in the region of all the oxygen you breath in, like 80% leaves when you exhale. (Talk about a WASTE!)

What hits all 3 area very well, is called "Interval training" Or "HIIT" (High Intensity Interval training"

The basic premise of the idea is to spike your heart rate (through sprinting/high activity) and then bring it back down a bit. (waiting a period of time/lower activity) then Spike it again right after, then lower it, then Spike it!

and repeat. Its like doing repetitions with a weight. It forces your body to understand that at any given instant it NEEDS to be able to handle a increased demand of oxygen to the muscles and the heart. Which in turn builds more capillaries for blood to travel through (IE more lanes in a highway, more oxygen to the muscle) and more capillaries in your lungs, (allows you to bring oxygen into your body)

And with training, and effort your times should increase really well actually.
any further questions?

Also a 300 yard sprint is actually very hard to do.
When "sprinting" longer distences, you just want to start at a bit of a slower speed then full tilt and maintain it through the run.
IE if you can sprint at 100% for 100 yards, but then you drop to 75% for about 100 yards. then off to 60% for 50 yards. then 40% for the last 50 yard

But you might get a better time running at 80% for 150 Yards. then 70% for the next 100 then 65% for the last 50

Edited by Eskimo, 24 June 2012 - 12:07 PM.

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#5 The Bacon Man

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Posted 24 June 2012 - 01:09 PM

Thanks for all the replies so far.


Alright, there is alot to go over. So im going to ignore the Diet portion of the speech (Which BTW is like 80% of getting better at anything. What you eat is Crucial to your performance on any given day)

Generally when you want to build endurance the way you do. what your looking for is to improve your Resistance To fatigue. Becuase lets face it, you can sprint full tilt for 10 seconds... but then you....start... to......slow..........down.

So. How do you make that 10 seconds become 11? Or 12? 13? what ABOUT 14?

3 things are going to be key:

1: The Muscle in your Heart, the stronger this is. The less it has to work. Which in turn means you can work just as hard. for longer.

2: Your Body's ability to Move Blood to your muscles. Obviously your legs are going full tilt. but even if your heart is the strongest thing in the world. there is no use if you only have a few VERY TINY Capillaries letting 1 blood cell, to transfer 1 molecule of oxygen to an entire section of the muscle at a time. You basically get a traffic jam effect. where you have lots of blood getting shoved into a small vein. which ends up just being as slow as the amount of "lanes" the blood can travel through.

3: Your bodys Ability to physically USE the oxygen you have, If you breath in. And breath out. Somewhere in the region of all the oxygen you breath in, like 80% leaves when you exhale. (Talk about a WASTE!)

What hits all 3 area very well, is called "Interval training" Or "HIIT" (High Intensity Interval training"

The basic premise of the idea is to spike your heart rate (through sprinting/high activity) and then bring it back down a bit. (waiting a period of time/lower activity) then Spike it again right after, then lower it, then Spike it!

and repeat. Its like doing repetitions with a weight. It forces your body to understand that at any given instant it NEEDS to be able to handle a increased demand of oxygen to the muscles and the heart. Which in turn builds more capillaries for blood to travel through (IE more lanes in a highway, more oxygen to the muscle) and more capillaries in your lungs, (allows you to bring oxygen into your body)

And with training, and effort your times should increase really well actually.
any further questions?

Also a 300 yard sprint is actually very hard to do.
When "sprinting" longer distences, you just want to start at a bit of a slower speed then full tilt and maintain it through the run.
IE if you can sprint at 100% for 100 yards, but then you drop to 75% for about 100 yards. then off to 60% for 50 yards. then 40% for the last 50 yard

But you might get a better time running at 80% for 150 Yards. then 70% for the next 100 then 65% for the last 50



I know about good diet, I'll try to follow a diet related to losing weight, because If I'm doing all this exercising, I might as well burn a few pounds. Also 10 pounds less should make me faster.

I'm not sure If this is interval training, but a while ago I heard about someone who would sprint 5-10 secs, jog 30-45, and do that over and over again, then rest, then do it again. Is that good? I'll see if I could do this on a tread mill because it's more convenient.

#6 G4paintballer

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Posted 24 June 2012 - 04:11 PM

Also 10 pounds less should make me faster.

That's not always true, when I was 197 pounds I could still run faster than my 150 lb friends.
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#7 Eskimo

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Posted 24 June 2012 - 05:30 PM

I know about good diet, I'll try to follow a diet related to losing weight, because If I'm doing all this exercising, I might as well burn a few pounds. Also 10 pounds less should make me faster.

I'm not sure If this is interval training, but a while ago I heard about someone who would sprint 5-10 secs, jog 30-45, and do that over and over again, then rest, then do it again. Is that good? I'll see if I could do this on a tread mill because it's more convenient.


1) Weight doesnt represent speed very well. A good example: Chriz hazard on our team probably has 30 - 40 pounds on me easy. Im a skinny guy. and he has actual muscle mass. At Canadian Carnage, HE lead the opening sprint in front of all the skinny guys. By an easy 10 Feet to.
Strong muscles can push a body well. instead of focusing on a "Diet" to lose weight, work on eating right to help build strong muscles and bones. Because you will actually be stronger and faster then the guy 20 pounds under you, but with smaller muscles.

2) What you heard follows the criteria. you spike the heart rate, then move at a slower pace to bring it down. then spike it again, then move at a slower pace to slow it down.

I'd suggest doing sprints/joggin on a piece of land, When you increase speeds dramatically the treadmill doesn't instantly pick up speed too.

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#8 The Bacon Man

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 08:26 PM


Also 10 pounds less should make me faster.

That's not always true, when I was 197 pounds I could still run faster than my 150 lb friends.



No, I mean I'm 110, when I'm 100 I should be faster than I was. I'm 110 now and faster than some 100 friends.


I know about good diet, I'll try to follow a diet related to losing weight, because If I'm doing all this exercising, I might as well burn a few pounds. Also 10 pounds less should make me faster.

I'm not sure If this is interval training, but a while ago I heard about someone who would sprint 5-10 secs, jog 30-45, and do that over and over again, then rest, then do it again. Is that good? I'll see if I could do this on a tread mill because it's more convenient.


1) Weight doesnt represent speed very well. A good example: Chriz hazard on our team probably has 30 - 40 pounds on me easy. Im a skinny guy. and he has actual muscle mass. At Canadian Carnage, HE lead the opening sprint in front of all the skinny guys. By an easy 10 Feet to.
Strong muscles can push a body well. instead of focusing on a "Diet" to lose weight, work on eating right to help build strong muscles and bones. Because you will actually be stronger and faster then the guy 20 pounds under you, but with smaller muscles.

2) What you heard follows the criteria. you spike the heart rate, then move at a slower pace to bring it down. then spike it again, then move at a slower pace to slow it down.

I'd suggest doing sprints/joggin on a piece of land, When you increase speeds dramatically the treadmill doesn't instantly pick up speed too.


Alright thanks. And I said above what I meant with the weight.




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