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#1 paul33kane

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 09:11 PM

Anyone know if cold weather can effect a gog envys eletronics to mess up the point that ur having problems such as barrel breaks and abnormal shoot ing like balls comming out with very little vilocity and other issues i am talking about cold like minus five to minus ten celcius.. any info would be greatly appreicated. cause when i came home and cleaned and lubed my marker and shot a hopper of paint it shot it shot perfectly and no breaks in the barrell but in was in my garge and it was somwhat warmer than earlier today. thanks.

#2 BurningPlaydoh

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 09:38 PM

It wouldnt be the electronics that are affected. Cold weather makes paintballs britttle and they will often be broken by the bolt or in the barrel.

A common problem with spool valve markers like the eNVy is something called "bolt stick". This happens when there isnt a proper amount of lube (either too much or too little) on the bolt and guide. In cold weather the lube often thickens up and causes bolt stick. My advice would be to use a thinner coat of lube if you know you are going to be playing in cold weather. Also make sure you have a fresh Duracell or Energizer battery in your marker, low batteries can cause similar problems tht get even worse in cold weather.

#3 paul33kane

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 10:00 PM

thank you i went to a thinner lube i was using sleek but its way to thick so i went to a lube called techt gun sav recomended by my local pro shop and there was a brand new duracell in there. funny thing is i came home cleaned and re lubed everything and shot a full hopper with out a hicup the only difference was that is was warmer hence the topic thanks for the info though.

#4 Soundwave

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 08:23 AM

Gun sav is definitely a better choice in Barrie.

It's getting later in the season now, so it'll start to warm up and this will stop being an issue until next winter, but if you find yourself having sticking problems again, another thing you can try is thinning out your grease with oil.

Start with an amount of grease (like a little in a bottle cap or something) and add a couple drops of oil to it and mix it around. This will help thin the grease up and stop it getting as sticky in winter. You'll have to experiment a little with the ratio's to get it right, but this is another way of solving the problem :)


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#5 paul33kane

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 08:34 AM

thanks thats the only thing i can think of that it is the lube is getting sticky in the cold weather cause when i shot it last night after cleaning and relubing it . I shot a full hopper in the garage and it was some what warmer it ripped not even a hicup...thanks for the info.

#6 Danny D

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 01:44 PM

It wouldnt be the electronics that are affected. Cold weather makes paintballs britttle and they will often be broken by the bolt or in the barrel.

A common problem with spool valve markers like the eNVy is something called "bolt stick". This happens when there isnt a proper amount of lube (either too much or too little) on the bolt and guide. In cold weather the lube often thickens up and causes bolt stick. My advice would be to use a thinner coat of lube if you know you are going to be playing in cold weather. Also make sure you have a fresh Duracell or Energizer battery in your marker, low batteries can cause similar problems tht get even worse in cold weather.


This is a common misconception. Ive done a study on the punkworks forum on this platform. The batteries were found to have a lower power output at below zero degrees. This made the markers do some weird things that could be mistaken for "bolt stick" or the marker not working. The issue is, with the reduced power output, the solenoid cannot function properly. Alkalines are the worst for this. Lithium rechargables work best in cold weather with no problems occuring even with the rest of the marker at -18 degrees celcius!

#7 HeroForADay

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 01:48 PM


It wouldnt be the electronics that are affected. Cold weather makes paintballs britttle and they will often be broken by the bolt or in the barrel.

A common problem with spool valve markers like the eNVy is something called "bolt stick". This happens when there isnt a proper amount of lube (either too much or too little) on the bolt and guide. In cold weather the lube often thickens up and causes bolt stick. My advice would be to use a thinner coat of lube if you know you are going to be playing in cold weather. Also make sure you have a fresh Duracell or Energizer battery in your marker, low batteries can cause similar problems tht get even worse in cold weather.


This is a common misconception. Ive done a study on the punkworks forum on this platform. The batteries were found to have a lower power output at below zero degrees. This made the markers do some weird things that could be mistaken for "bolt stick" or the marker not working. The issue is, with the reduced power output, the solenoid cannot function properly. Alkalines are the worst for this. Lithium rechargables work best in cold weather with no problems occuring even with the rest of the marker at -18 degrees celcius!


This is directly connected to the solenoid functioning properly in cold weather as well. Bolt stick is part of the problem, but solenoid issues related to the lower power output, and the spool within the noid sticking are likely another cause for some cold weather issues.

#8 paul33kane

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Posted 21 April 2013 - 02:08 PM

thanks for the info guys much appriecation and i will let you know by posting here what happens when it gets warm lol ... awesome info thanks

#9 paul33kane

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 08:53 PM

well just a update could not solve the problem my self so got my local airsmith to help and guess what he determined that my solenoid is gone turns out it would intermitatly not function properly so have a new one on order and lets see what happens.

#10 BurningPlaydoh

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Posted 02 June 2013 - 09:27 PM



It wouldnt be the electronics that are affected. Cold weather makes paintballs britttle and they will often be broken by the bolt or in the barrel.

A common problem with spool valve markers like the eNVy is something called "bolt stick". This happens when there isnt a proper amount of lube (either too much or too little) on the bolt and guide. In cold weather the lube often thickens up and causes bolt stick. My advice would be to use a thinner coat of lube if you know you are going to be playing in cold weather. Also make sure you have a fresh Duracell or Energizer battery in your marker, low batteries can cause similar problems tht get even worse in cold weather.


This is a common misconception. Ive done a study on the punkworks forum on this platform. The batteries were found to have a lower power output at below zero degrees. This made the markers do some weird things that could be mistaken for "bolt stick" or the marker not working. The issue is, with the reduced power output, the solenoid cannot function properly. Alkalines are the worst for this. Lithium rechargables work best in cold weather with no problems occuring even with the rest of the marker at -18 degrees celcius!


This is directly connected to the solenoid functioning properly in cold weather as well. Bolt stick is part of the problem, but solenoid issues related to the lower power output, and the spool within the noid sticking are likely another cause for some cold weather issues.

If that was the case poppet-valve markers would have just as many cold weather problems. IIRC the Gog markers use the same or a similar solenoid as the Luxe and those high-quality noids are made to work under some incredible conditions.

#11 Danny D

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 09:25 PM

Poppits use less dwell. Therefore need less battery power. Luxe has a capacitor which helps prevent low battery power by charging before setting off the noid.

Iirc the luxe and gog mamarkers use different noids. Gog uses proprietary 3 ways, luxe and shockers use 4 ways from 2 other outside manufacturers. Either way, if the noids are power starved they will cease to function properly.

Edited by Danny D, 03 June 2013 - 09:26 PM.


#12 BurningPlaydoh

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:44 PM

Poppits use less dwell. Therefore need less battery power. Luxe has a capacitor which helps prevent low battery power by charging before setting off the noid.

Iirc the luxe and gog mamarkers use different noids. Gog uses proprietary 3 ways, luxe and shockers use 4 ways from 2 other outside manufacturers. Either way, if the noids are power starved they will cease to function properly.

Lol time on =/= voltage required. If two noids require the same input they will both function (or malfunction) under the same conditions and since poppet-valved markers don't have cold weather issues...

Edited by BurningPlaydoh, 03 June 2013 - 10:46 PM.


#13 HeroForADay

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 12:59 AM

Poppet valves do have cold weather issues, they're just less pronounced as the system relies on fewer orings. The solenoid Posted Image isn't the be all and end all problem, I don't think anybody said it was, but it does play a role in cold weather mechanics. Either through the batteries not supply enough consistent power to properly cycle, or the added mechanical resistance of the cold weather firming up seals and making lubricants more viscous.

#14 Danny D

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 10:11 PM


Poppits use less dwell. Therefore need less battery power. Luxe has a capacitor which helps prevent low battery power by charging before setting off the noid.

Iirc the luxe and gog mamarkers use different noids. Gog uses proprietary 3 ways, luxe and shockers use 4 ways from 2 other outside manufacturers. Either way, if the noids are power starved they will cease to function properly.

Lol time on =/= voltage required. If two noids require the same input they will both function (or malfunction) under the same conditions and since poppet-valved markers don't have cold weather issues...




Power does not equal voltage. I said power, not voltage. Electric power is a function of voltage AND current. Current and voltage is reduced in cold weather applications.

Gog markers use noids that need a lot more power due to higher dwell and lack of capacitor
Poppits use less dwell and noids that may or may not have a capacitor which helps to keep the power supply to the noid consistent.
Dwell = electric actuation of solenoid. More time = more power needed. If this power level is not reached, the solenoid will not actuate for the full dwell time.

I tried to dumb it down for you since not everyone draws circuit diagrams for breakfast or teaches Electricity and Physics for a career like I do. If you need a more in depth explanation I can give it. But the driving home point is that not all boards and noids are created equal. Hero brought up a great point as well about Poppits not being able to escape it either.

I implore you all to take a look at my cold weather spool test on punkworks:
http://www.techpb.co...1

Edited by Danny D, 04 June 2013 - 10:13 PM.


#15 BurningPlaydoh

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 10:39 PM



Poppits use less dwell. Therefore need less battery power. Luxe has a capacitor which helps prevent low battery power by charging before setting off the noid.

Iirc the luxe and gog mamarkers use different noids. Gog uses proprietary 3 ways, luxe and shockers use 4 ways from 2 other outside manufacturers. Either way, if the noids are power starved they will cease to function properly.

Lol time on =/= voltage required. If two noids require the same input they will both function (or malfunction) under the same conditions and since poppet-valved markers don't have cold weather issues...




Power does not equal voltage. I said power, not voltage. Electric power is a function of voltage AND current. Current and voltage is reduced in cold weather applications.

Gog markers use noids that need a lot more power due to higher dwell and lack of capacitor
Poppits use less dwell and noids that may or may not have a capacitor which helps to keep the power supply to the noid consistent.
Dwell = electric actuation of solenoid. More time = more power needed. If this power level is not reached, the solenoid will not actuate for the full dwell time.

I tried to dumb it down for you since not everyone draws circuit diagrams for breakfast or teaches Electricity and Physics for a career like I do. If you need a more in depth explanation I can give it. But the driving home point is that not all boards and noids are created equal. Hero brought up a great point as well about Poppits not being able to escape it either.

I implore you all to take a look at my cold weather spool test on punkworks:
http://www.techpb.co...1

Is the purpose of the capacitor to insure consistent voltage to the noid or provide a higher voltage required for it to operate?

#16 Dogg3

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 10:45 PM




Poppits use less dwell. Therefore need less battery power. Luxe has a capacitor which helps prevent low battery power by charging before setting off the noid.

Iirc the luxe and gog mamarkers use different noids. Gog uses proprietary 3 ways, luxe and shockers use 4 ways from 2 other outside manufacturers. Either way, if the noids are power starved they will cease to function properly.

Lol time on =/= voltage required. If two noids require the same input they will both function (or malfunction) under the same conditions and since poppet-valved markers don't have cold weather issues...




Power does not equal voltage. I said power, not voltage. Electric power is a function of voltage AND current. Current and voltage is reduced in cold weather applications.

Gog markers use noids that need a lot more power due to higher dwell and lack of capacitor
Poppits use less dwell and noids that may or may not have a capacitor which helps to keep the power supply to the noid consistent.
Dwell = electric actuation of solenoid. More time = more power needed. If this power level is not reached, the solenoid will not actuate for the full dwell time.

I tried to dumb it down for you since not everyone draws circuit diagrams for breakfast or teaches Electricity and Physics for a career like I do. If you need a more in depth explanation I can give it. But the driving home point is that not all boards and noids are created equal. Hero brought up a great point as well about Poppits not being able to escape it either.

I implore you all to take a look at my cold weather spool test on punkworks:
http://www.techpb.co...1

Is the purpose of the capacitor to insure consistent voltage to the noid or provide a higher voltage required for it to operate?

From what I'm given to understand, capacitors alone cannot supply voltage greater than their supply. If the cap is given 5v, the absolute most it can output is 5v.

Please correct if wrong.

Oh and in case this isn't unprofessional enough yet.

Fuck, shit, boobs, purple monkey dishwasher.


#17 Danny D

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 08:49 AM

The capacitors purpose is to provide consistent power and voltage to the load in dc circuits.

They can provide higher voltage if the circuit and capacitor are designed for it. Those old disposable cameras has a single aa battery in them but had a large capacitor that took 30 seconds to charge to operate the flash. The aa battery voltage and current alone couldn't operate a high power device such as a camera flash.

In cold weather, or low battery operation the capacitor needs more time to charge since battery output is lower than normal. In properly constructed boards rof will lower and the marker will function correctly.

Edited by Danny D, 05 June 2013 - 08:58 AM.





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