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#1 reflexowner

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 10:01 AM

Is it bad to lifting weights at 14? I've been reading that is bad for you and it makes you short ( I'm like 5,4 well my friend are 5,6 or 7) and I don't really want it to stunt my growth. I'm only lifting 7 pounds weights so its not a huge amount. And I'm mostly doing body weight exercises.

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#2 kingJurzy

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 12:29 PM

There are 14 year old football players that are just as big as their 18 year old counterparts.



7 lbs is nothing. You should be fine.

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#3 TacticlTwinkie

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 01:27 PM

No you're fine. Super heavy lifting may be bad at your age, but 7 pound dumbbells won't hurt anything. When I was a freshman in highschool (age 15), we were strength training for football. Of course never done anything like that before, we were going reliavely light compared to subsequent months and years of heavy lifting. I'm an average 5'10". Lots of my friends who also did it are regular heights.

#4 Old Dude PB

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 01:51 PM

Ask your pediatrician. A medical doctor might know more about what's good for your body than a bunch of anonymous guys on the internet. I know, it's a stretch.

#5 kingJurzy

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 01:55 PM

Ask your pediatrician. A medical doctor might know more about what's good for your body than a bunch of anonymous guys on the internet. I know, it's a stretch.


lol also this Posted Image

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#6 reflexowner

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 02:33 PM

But insnt every one on the Internet a doctor??? Lol

 


#7 G4paintballer

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 10:04 AM

If you lift heavier weights with good form you shouldn't have a problem.
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#8 imnothim

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 02:38 PM

Your height, bone structure etc. all depends on your genetics long before you're born (obviously with the exception of diseases or genetic conditions which may affect you after birth). In otherwise healthy individuals, light to moderate weight training is not only healthy but should be encouraged. If it was detrimental then thousands of generations of children who worked on their parents farms would have suffered from stunted growth. You can bet lifting bails of hay, tilling soil etc. was/is far more labour intensive than pull ups or 7lb weights. Add to that they did it 7 days a week since they were 6 and you see my point.
Id stick to calisthenics at first(body weight exercises like pullups, pushups, dips etc) as they tend to be compound movement that work multiple muscle groups. And they don't require much if any equipment. Keep a journal and add weight slowly. Read as much as you can to educate yourself.

#9 The Bacon Man

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 06:05 PM

I started lifting 5x5 at 13, I'm 14 now.  You are a-ok.  Before you start lifting heavy, learn the right form.  Study form religiously, video yourself doing it and correct your mistakes until you can lift perfectly.  Growth stunts, injuries, nerve damage, etc all come from improper form, unless you are way too young (like 10).



#10 The Bacon Man

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 06:07 PM

Also I have a strange feeling your just doing bicep curls.  It's fine to start, but you should

 

1) Buy a barbell (olympic sized)

                 or

2)  Invest in a gym membership

 

Do compound exercises that work multiple muscles.  Squats, cleans, dead lifts, military presses, bench presses, sprints, etc.

 

Form and Quality > Quantity is the golden rule.  Do everything from running to pushups perfectly.  10 solid pushups work you better than 20 regular pushups.

 

If you want, I can write out the program I use.


Edited by The Bacon Man, 28 June 2013 - 06:10 PM.


#11 Scorpian

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 06:42 AM

Hey dude, at your age weight lifting does not equal shortness. To keep it in simplest terms, there are things called growth plates on your bones, which when soft and spongy (i.e. untill you'r about 18) will allow for growth. Weight lifting does not cause them to harden, it can when done properly however, help you grow. Some things however will cause these to harden early including: booze, smoking, caffein (caffeinated soda, coffee, tea, ENERGY DRINKS) and opiates (cocane, heroin, opium, etc.). Basically stick with a healthy lifestyle and you should be good. Want proof? I didn't and i'm 6ft tall my friend alex did, he's 6'5". Also high school pro tip, join the gymnastics team, not as glamorous as football but those guys get jacked!

#12 Pvlacrosse14

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 10:22 AM

I'm 14 as well. I started lifting at 10 for football training. Just remember as everyone else said, proper form is key and don't be afraid to ask others how to do/use certain things. It's much better to ask and feel like a newbie than to try doing it yourself, look like a newbie doing that, and hurt yourself at the same time.

I started lifting with proper form and I injured myself. I got nothing out of that month AT ALL. When I started lifting with proper form, going very slow and taking breaths between each rep, I started seeing some good results
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#13 TechPB-Mike

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 02:14 PM

my only advice is that to be ready to significantly increase your calorie intake

 

As a teenager, you body is still growing. This is why teenagers can eat six 800+ calories meal a day and barely gain an ounce. If you add weight lifting to this, you will need to eat even more to cover your additional muscle growth and tissue repair.

 

Nothing wrong with lifting weights at all as a teenager, but remember this motto - When in doubt, do it light, and do it right. If you are unsure of a particular lift, do it light until you get the proper training and form down.

 

You don't want to be 18 years old with a slipped disk, or ripped rotator cuff.






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