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#1 Simiballer

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 08:24 AM

After you get done playing a day of paintbalnd are heading home, are you supposed to release the air in your hpa tank? l haven't received mine yet (going down to buy one tomorrow), but I was just thinking that it could be possibly dangerous to have a full tank in your car and house for weeks at a time . Also, how would ou release the air? Thanks.
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#2 Toxin PB

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 08:53 AM

No, you don't have to release the air.

#3 Old Dude PB

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 09:54 AM

I can't speak for how dangerous it is, but I'll admit that the last thing I do before I leave any field is fill any and all tanks that I've brought with me, so I can test/tech markers at home. I also have a scuba tank, but that only fills to 3000 psi, and it's just nice to have more air. To let all the air out of a tank, you can just screw it into a spare ASA, (or pull the macro line out of the ASA on your gun).



#4 Sydarm

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 01:25 PM

Leaving air tanks filled is fine.

#5 TacticlTwinkie

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 01:59 PM

its quite safe. the burst disks (the safety release valves) will go off well before the bottle of the tank will fail. Just store the tanks indoors, out of dirrect sunlight and you will be good to go. a closet or cabinet is ideal for tank storage.

#6 III Kezia III

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:51 PM

also the air is great for helping to clean out your spare marker if you have one, just screw in the tank and remove the macro line and use it to help blow any dust, dirty, paint etc


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#7 Shonz-On

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 05:03 PM

We have over 30 scuba tanks stored in a no-ac metal warehouse shop at any given time. We have 2, sometimes 3, sit in the back of a black liner pick-up truck in direct sunlight, when weather permits. We even have a stubby spare-air tank in the back window (filled, 2.5k) behind the head rests. All filled, 3k-3.2k. Been doing this for 5yrs now.

 

All tanks given care from damage and corosion, inside and out, and hydro'd every routine, should be safe.

 

Most fill air is ambient air temp +5*f. So based on temperature of the air, being when the tank gets warmer, the pressure increases. I don't know the exacts, but a cold fill, 65ish morning, at hotter time of day, 85ish lunch time, we get at most 200psi added to an unsed or freshly changed tank.

If it's stored inside, it shouldn't matter unless your house catches fire.


Edited by Shonz-On, 29 October 2013 - 05:08 PM.


#8 Simiballer

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 06:58 PM

Oh ok, thanks you guys!
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