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Ultimate Threshold Breakdown & Maintenance


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#1 Colter

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:47 PM

Welcome to the World of the Threshold Marker!

Below you will find links that will allow you to skip to whichever section you need in order to keep your Threshold in Excellent Working Condition!

I have included "Tips n Tricks" in each section that I have found useful and hope you will find then enlightening as well.

You will notice that throughout the tutorial that I use many different lubes to maintain my Threshold Marker. These are not required and you may use any lubes that you have available to you.

Warning!
I tried to write this with detailed descriptions and pictures to help everyone.
I'm not responsible for any damage that might occur to any marker while someone tries to follow this tutorial. I have no control over what a person will do while reading this and will not take responsibility for there action. If you are not comfortable with doing anything listed below, please contact Dangerous Power for instructions, or take your Threshold marker to any Dangerous Power Certified Technician.

Dangerous Powers Contact Information can be found Here[/URL]

Links to Section:

Maintaining Your Bolt Assembly
HPR Breakdown - High Pressure Regulator
RAPS Breakdown - Rapid Air Pressurizing System
Separating the Body and Frame
Solenoid Breakdown
Trigger Breakdown
Teflon Tape Mod for Sail O-ring


How often should you lube the Regulator and Bolt Assembly you say?
I don't think there is a clear cut, by the book, solid known answer to this.

There are too many things like:

What kind of lube you use?
How much do you play?
How much do you shoot?
How clean is the fills that your getting at the places you play?

I can't tell you exactly when you need to clean and relube, but I'll tell you what I do.
I disassemble clean and lube my bolt after each day of play. Typically if I still have good lube on the bolt and no paint at all I'll just inspect it and lube where needed.
The HPR I inspect after about 7 cases or so. Usually I don't keep track so the HPR reminds me by having inconsistent FPS at the Crono.
SO Keep your bolt lubed at all times and HPR after 5-7 cases or when it gets inconsistent.
The solenoid RARELY needs to be lubed. Just check it once after you have bought the Threshold replace the green lube with a non swelling lube 50/50 ideally and enjoy playing with it. The venting air from the bolt will blow lube through your noid, so as long as you keep your bolt lubed, your noid will be lubed.

Additionally, the Threshold is a low pressure marker. The HPR (high pressure regulator) will allow you to adjust your tanks pressure to the markers operating pressure, which is about 150 psi. The Threshold doesn't have a gauge on the HPR so that is just an estimate. Since the Threshold's OP (operating pressure) is below what a HP (high pressure 850psi) and LP (low pressure 450psi) tank, either HP or LP tank will work with the Threshold equally well.

#2 Colter

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:48 PM

Threshold Bolt Maintenance/Disassembly



Regular maintenance of the bolt assembly is vital to a trouble free operation of the Threshold.



For the regular cleaning of the marker skip Steps #7, #8, and #9.



Here is what I do for regular maintenance. This is more detailed then what is necessary, but is what I have found to keep my marker working in optimal performance and trouble free operation. A lubes used are my preference and I'll give reason to why I use them over others. However, a 50/50 mix will work for all application, but will need more attention, more regularly. Dow 33 will work by itself, but because of the viscosity (thickness) of it, it can cause FSDO (first shot drop off) and/or bolt stick. 50/50 mixture is recommended.

In some of the pictures you will notice that I have the frame removed from the body. This isn't needed. I just happen to have the body separated at the time.



Tools needed:


3/16 allen wrench

50/50 mix Equal parts dow33 and Gold Cup

Dental tool or O-ring pick set

Rag



Step #1 As you can see in the picture. A clean work area makes the job easy and makes it less likely that pieces and O-ring will be misplaced. The threshold marker was designed to be stripped, cleaned, and put back together, at the field, easily and within only a couple minutes.

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Step #2 Unscrew the back cap counter clockwise, using the 3/16 allen wrench included with your marker.

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Step #3
Shown is the complete assembly of the bolt, body, and back cap.

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Step #4 Remove the bolt from the body and wipe the bolt and O-ring clean. Don't forget to clean the inside rear of the bolt with the rag also. Replace any damaged O-ring and then reapply the 50/50 mix lube on the 3 O-rings, located at the front of the bolt. Notice that it doesn't take much. Too much lube will cause FSDO (first shot drop off), or bolt stick. I also lube the bolt in this area so that it will lube the internal O-ring in the body when the bolts replaced. The outside of the bolt doesn't need lube anywhere else.

At this time you should clean in internals of the body. Just wipe clean what you can reach with the rag. The front chamber, feedneck, and barrel threads should be wiped clean. If you have had a ball beak in the chamber, the eye covers should be removed, using the 5/64 allen wrench. Use the pick to aid in the separation on the eyes and eye wires from the body. Be careful with the eye wires. Clean the eyes, dents, and eye covers from all paint before replacing them on the body. The dents don't need to be lubed.

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Step #5 I use slick honey on these next couple areas, but the 50/50 mix will work. The Slickhoney needs only a film on the internal of the rear of the bolt. Too much and it'll cause problems. It will last longer and is slicker than any other lube that I've found. You can even skip this step and just apply it to the back cap O-ring as seen in the next step.

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Step #6
After wiping all the dirty lube from the back cap and it's O-rings, reapply fresh clean lube. Don't forget to lube the back cap sealing O-ring located next to the threaded area that screws into the body. Just a light coat will do. If your back cap comes loose while shooting, it's most likely due to this O-ring. If the cap does come loose, a swelling lube like dow55 will help.

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Step #7 It is not necessary to lube the bumper O-ring, although, because of some reports of the Bumper O-ring unseating itself, I do lube this with a swelling lube. So far I haven't had a problem with it unseating itself. I'm using Voltagepb Blood lube in the photo, but dow55 is fine. You don't need to take this O-ring out for any reason, unless it is damaged. Removal of this O-ring will make it more likely to unseat itself later. It is a very difficult O-ring to remove and replace.

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Step #8 This is a picture of the removal of the internal O-ring. It will rarely, if ever, need to be removed. However, if it becomes damaged and you hear a leak in the barrel area, this is most likely the cause. Using the pick, insert it down the barrel area to remove this O-ring. When reassembling, put it on your finger to press it back into the internal slot. Lubing this O-ring is not necessary since you can just apply the lube to the bolt and cycle it a few times to coat this O-ring. Look at the picture in Step#4 to see where to apply the lube to the bolt.

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Step #9 After putting the bolt back in the body. Move the bolt back and forth to coat the internal O-ring and make sure everything slides freely



:blink: Tips n Tricks :blink:

*Lube the threads on both halves of the barrel to prevent the threads from binding. I use Slickhoney as shown, but anything is better than nothing. I've been playing with the Threshold since Aug 07 and my threads still look like new. This is why they look like this and they always screw together like silk.

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*Less is more. I've found that a very thin film of Slickhoney on the bolt, between the front O-ring and second to end O-ring on the bolt, will help with smoother cycling. Since the Slickhoney only requires a very small amount, it's less likely to create bolt stick caused by over lubing.

#3 Colter

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:48 PM

Disassembly of the Threshold HPR (High Pressure Regulator)





Make sure that the macroline is removed and the Threshold has NO air in it.

Any thick lube would be fine to use for the lubing of the HPR assembly and O-rings. I have listed a couple suggestions that are my preference, but don't worry about rushing off to get them if you already have some lube on hand. Just use what you have. Thicker lubes will last longer between cleanings. Dow33 will even work, but will require cleaning/relubing more often. Don't use oil.



Here are the tools needed:

Strap wrench

1/4 allen wrench

3/8 allen wrench

(Substitute 3/8 allen wrench for a 1/4" and 1/8" allen wrenches which are included with new purchases)

Dow55 or similar thick lube

Rag



Step #1 Loosen the HPR by turning it counterclockwise by hand or strap wrench. If you don't have a strap wrench, a wet towel or even a computer mouse pad will give you a better grip when unscrewing this by hand.

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Step #2 If you can't remove the top of the HPR by hand, you can use either a 3/8" allen wrench (as shown)to loosen it. This allen wrench is not supplied with the Threshold and will have to be purchased separately. An alternative is to use the strap wrench, wet towel, or even a computer mouse pad to help you removed the HPR with.

Here's a little trick. Use the 1/4 allen wrench in combination with 1/8 allen wrench to loosen the top portion of the HPR. Simply put them side by side and use the same way as the 3/8 allen wrench.

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Step #3 Using the 1/4" allen wrench, screw the velocity screw clockwise until it stops. This will raise the piston and make it easier to remove.

Holding the bottom half of the HPR upside down, gently tap the assembly on a flat surface until the piston falls free.

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Step#4 Once the piston is out the assembly, it should look like this. Clean off all O-rings and wipe all surfaces clean. Replace any damaged O-rings.

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Step#5 There are 4 O-rings that need to be lubed occasionally on the HPR assembly.

2 of the O-rings you can see in this last picture on the piston need to be lubed with a thick lube. I like Voltagepb blood lube for these O-rings since it lasts much longer then Dow55 and also swells the O-rings, but you can use any lube you have on hand.

Dow 55 or a swelling lube should be used on the 2 O-rings on the top portion of the HPR when reassembling.

In the top left of the piston picture you will see a black area. This is the regulator seat. This little guy can cause problems so don't forget to inspect it for any damage. I apologize for not having a better picture of it, but Xluben will have better pictures of the regulator seat in his tutorial on the G3

Last but not least. Pay close attention to the # and order of the shim stack.

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Now just a few suggestions:


The HPR doesn't need to be lubed after each day of play. Clean when you are getting inconsistencies in velocity. From my experience, letting the O-rings settle and seal will make the HPR more consistent (breaking in the regulator)

There is no reason take off the C-clip or the velocity screw at the bottom of the regulator, unless they are damaged and there is a leak in that area. The right tools make a job easy. This is the tool that you will need to remove the C-clip correctly and easily. I bought this at Harbor Freight for under $5.

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:blink: Tips n Tricks :blink:



**If you don't like having to use a strap wrench or allen wrenches every time you need to clean your HPR, simply put a small amount of lube on the threads to prevent the threads from binding. I use Voltagepb Gold or Slickhoney to do this. It's very thick, super slick, and won't wear off. It keeps the threads looking new. Any thick lube would be fine for this application, although some will last longer than other.



*This is not necessary to do, but if you're going to store your marker for an extended period of time. A very small amount of oil can be applied to the shims and then wiped off, so you have only a very thin layer on the shims. If you apply too much the shims can stick to one another, so just a small amount. The coating on the shims should prevent any moisture from corroding the metal shims, but it's just an added protection.

#4 Colter

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:48 PM

Disassembly of the R.A.P.S. (Rapid Air Pressurizing System)




It’s entirely up to you to remove the RAPS from the rail or not. It’s not necessary if you just need to lube the piston or if you’re troubleshooting a leak.




Tools Needed:


3/32 allen wrench

5/64 allen wrench

Dow55 or similar swelling lube



Step #1 If you would like to take off the RAPS from the rail use a 3/32 allen wrench to loosen the set screw. You shouldn’t need to remove the screw completely to get the RAPS off.

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Step #2 Unscrew the screw securing the lever, spring, and piston to the RAPS using a 5/64 allen wrench.

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Step#3 This is the internals of the RAPS. The piston, with the 2 orings on it, need to be lubed with dow55 or similar swelling lube.

These 2 orings are the cause of most leaks associated with the RAPS. Usually you just have to lube the orings, but if they show any signs of wear, replace them. Lube them with any lube you have on hand, swelling lubes work better though. I like the Voltagepb lube, because it doesn’t wear off. A similar lube that would work great is Slickhoney, but since it doesn’t have any swelling properties, I use the Voltagepb Blood over it. If you lube with Dow55 and you get a leak, it’s most likely because the lube has worn off and you just need to relube them.

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:blink: Tips n Tricks :blink:



*The threaded hole on the side of the RAPS shouldn’t be messed with, unless you’re mounting a gauge or wanting to switch your macroline fitting to the other side of the RAPS. If you get a leak from that spot, Teflon or Blue Loctite should fix it. If you use Teflon tape make sure that it’s only on the threads of the screw.




*A small amount of lube on the threads where the tank screws in will help ease screwing the tank in and out. Apply it with your finger to either the tank threads or the internal RAPS threads. Don’t use oil.



*Always completely degas your marker prior to trying to remove the tank. After flipping the lever up, shoot a few times w/eyes off to get the rest of the air out of your marker. This will ensure that no pressure is still pressing against the tank, and will keep both the RAPS and tank threads in good condition.



*Here’s something to save you some grief with putting you’re micro lines into the elbows.

Taper/round the end of the macro fitting slightly. In the picture I just cut it with a razor blade. It makes inserting the macro much easier and holds just as well as leaving it at a 90* angle.

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#5 Colter

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:49 PM

Separation of the Thresholds Body and Frame





This will help anyone needing to add a trigger rendition kit, service the solenoid, or troubleshoot a leak between the frame and body. If you still have your HPR attached you will need to remove that first. Use a strap wrench to remove the HPR before beginning.



What you'll need:


3/32" Allen Wrench

5/64" Allen Wrench

1/4" Allen Wrench

Pair of small pliers

Dow 55 or similar swelling lube





Step #1 Remove the grip screws from the left side of the grip frame using the 3/32 allen wrench. You can remove both sides, but it's not necessary.

Also remove the Eye covers on both sides using the 5/64 allen wrench.

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Step #2
Loosen the snatch grip's hidden screw with the 3/32 allen wrench. 1/2 – 3/4 turn is all it takes. There is no need to remove the screw. Then simply slide off the snatch grip.

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Step #3 Loosen the grip frame's hidden screw the same way you did the snatch grip. Remember you only need to loosen it.

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Step #4 Remove the Screw in the front of the marker where the HPR was mounted, using the 1/4 allen wrench.

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Step #5 Time to unplug the solenoid connector from the circuit board using the pliers. Grab only the top half of the connecter when doing this. Do this carefully so you don't bend the pins or damage the connector. Sometimes the whole connecter will slide off the pins. That's okay. Just separate the connector's pieces and slide the bottom/receiving end back on the pins. Be sure to do it carefully so you don't damage the pins

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Step #6 The grip frame should now be able to slide about 1/2 inch rearward on the body. You should then be able to separate the frame and body easily. Be careful with the solenoid connector snagging on any other wires when separating the body and frame. The eyes should be removed from the body at this time. Notice that the eye wires run on one side of the solenoid when separating. This is how you will need it to run them inside the frame when you put it back together, or it can interfere with the trigger.

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Step #7 The O-ring in the picture is the one you will need to put the Dow55 on. This O-ring will nearly never need to be changed. If there is a leak in that area and that O-ring is suspected to be damaged, it's more likely to be the front frame screw not being tight enough. Make sure that the O-ring is in its proper place before remounting the frame to body.

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:blink: Tips n Tricks :blink:




*Use super glue to adhere the dent spring to the eye cover, and you'll never have to worry about losing it again. All it takes is a drop. Then place the spring back on the eye cover and let it dry before re-mounting the covers.

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Problem and Solution:

Since the frame screws are hidden inside the frame. If you strip one or both of the screws when trying to remove them, here's something that might help.

Put some superglue on the tip of your allen wrench head and insert it through the hole so it makes contact with the allen screw. Let it dry. It will sometimes work with superglue and if your lucky it'll work for you. A more extreme stripped screw, you could use JBweld or some other epoxy to do the same thing. However, please use more caution if you do. If you use epoxies, there is a greater chance of glueing something together that you don't want. If your hesitant about doing this, don't! Call DP and allow professions to handle it. If you do do this. Make sur that you glue it and then have enough room to unscrew it. ;)

#6 Colter

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:49 PM

Breakdown of the Threshold Solenoid




The Dangerous Power Threshold Solenoid is a very reliable, user friendly, and rarely ever needs to be cleaned or lubed. If you are not having marker problems, don't mess with it. If you are having problems with the cycling of your marker contact Dangerous Power. If they recommend you clean, lube, or replace O-ring on the piston, or replace the piston in the solenoid. I hope this tutorial will help you.



Refer to the "Complete Separation of the Thresholds Body and Frame" section to get to the point where you can access the solenoid.



Read completely before starting.



Tools needed:


5/32" Flathead Screwdriver

5/64 Allen wrench supplied with purchase

Small Needle Nose Pliers or small tweezers

Dental tool or O-ring pick

50/50 mix dow33 gold cup

Dow55 or similar swelling lube



Step #1 First, unscrew the 2 mounting screws securing the solenoid to the body. These screws have very small threads and, if over tightened, can strip very easily.

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Step #2 Remove the 2 O-rings that seal the solenoid to the body and place them in a bag or safe place. These are small and can be lost very easily.

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Step#3 Time to use that screwdriver. The screw driver I'm using is a 5/32 flat head screw driver. You can use another size screw driver just as long as it fits the screw's width. If you use too small of a screw driver; the screw will be harder to unscrew, can damage the screw head, and possibly strip the screw's head. This screw can be very tight and being on such a small object, can be difficult to loosen just by holding the solenoid. If you can't unscrew it by holding it, you can use a vice. Be sure to put something on the sides of the solenoid as to not damage it. You can also use vice grips, but as before, protect the solenoid from any metal device holding it! Leather is great to use.

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DON'T TOUCH THIS SIDE! Here is another picture, but of the wrong side! You don't need to open this side for anything ever. Notice the Hex head/Allen screws on this side? If you touch those screws and separate the halves of the solenoid, say bye-bye to your warranty! Unless instructed by Dangerous Power, leave this side alone.

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Here you can see what it will look like after you remove the screw.

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Step #4 Welcome to the most frustrating part of the solenoid. Depending on the condition of the O-rings, lube, and piston, this can be a pain in the…:crash: First remove the spring and set it aside. If you're lucky enough to have a pair of small tweezers that will allow you to just grab the piston, while fully inserted, your luckier than I am and can skip the next paragraph.



Here's the dance and be prepared to put your patience to the test. Find a hard flat surface that will not shake or move. Place a few sheets of paper or something similar that will remain flat, but won't harm the finish of the solenoid. Like the HPR's piston, you will need to turn it upside down. Holding it securely and at a perfect 90* angle to the flat surface; sharply hit it against the surface. You may need to do it several times, but what you want is to get the piston to move towards the screw opening.

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Step #5 You're Victorious! Get those needle nose pliers or small tweezers, and take it out the rest of the way. This is what you should have.

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Step #6 Clean it up, replace O-rings that are showing ANY wear, and relube with the 50/50 mix. You will only need a thin layer of lube on these O-ring. Don't over lube them and stay away from any swelling lubes.

Posted ImagePosted Image



To put back together, just reverse steps. You don't need the solenoid piston screw anywhere near as tight as they have from the factory. Just tighten it up, but don't crank down on it.

Also remember those 2 little O-rings that you placed in the bag. LIGHTLY lube them with Dow55 or other swelling lube and don't over tighten the screws that secure the solenoid to the body. Once you feel resistance, tighten each one just a little bit at a time, alternating from one to the other until tight.



:blink: Tips n Tricks :blink:



*It's worth it to find tweezers small enough to just grab the piston out of the solenoid. The best advice I can give is to find a solid flat surface to hit it on if you don't have tweezers or pliers that will allow you to just grab the piston. Granite countertops are ideal, but even hard wood table, or even a driveway (be sure to put something down i.e. towel) will do.



*If you need to replace any O-rings on the piston, save yourself the hassle and just cut them off. Replacing the O-rings on the piston is enough of a pain.



*Once the piston is properly lubed, hold it with the pliers and move it back and forth inside the solenoid. This will help get rid of the excess lube and make slide more easily, less likely to cause FSDO too.



*Lastly. That solenoid end screw that was a pain to get off. Clean the threads up before screwing it back on the solenoid. It'll make it easier to remove if you ever need to again.

#7 DOD

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:49 PM

There are no links

#8 Colter

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:49 PM

Threshold Trigger Removal



Before beginning, refer to the "Complete Separation of the Thresholds Body and Frame".



Once you have removed the frame from the body you will be able to begin with this section.



This section is for anyone changing out there trigger or installing a Magnetic Rendition Trigger Kit.



All that is needed is the 3/32 allen screw.



Step #1 Remove the Trigger mounting screw with the 3/32 allen wrench.

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Step #2 Remove the trigger out of the top of the trigger frame.

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Step #3 Take note on where the trigger return spring is located. If you are installing a Magnetic return, this is where you will be super gluing one of the magnets.

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Step #4 This picture shows how the trigger sets inside of the trigger frame. At the far end of the trigger directly above where the spring looks like it's going to touch the trigger, this is where the second magnet will mount for your magnetic return. Make sure that the magnets on both the frame and trigger will repel one another before you super glue the second magnet.

Posted Image



To put back together just reverse the steps.



B) ENJOY! B)

#9 Colter

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Posted 04 October 2008 - 05:49 PM

More links to come. I'll post them in the top post when I get them finished, but for now it's done.
Hope this helps!


To all the G3 owners.
The G3 is nearly identical on the breakdown of any of these sections. This thread should help you maintain your markers just like the Threshold owners.

#10 Babapb

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 04:31 PM

I have a question for the lube mix 50/50 dow 33 and gold cup is honey lube fine instead of mixing my own lube i heard the is about the same. And also where can i buy Voltagepb Blood because u said that is better than dow 55

Edited by Babapb, 01 February 2009 - 08:22 PM.

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#11 meMYSELFnI

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 10:59 PM

I wouldn't say Voltagepb lube is necessarily better, it's just has different properties then the typical Dow 55 lube. It's great for staying where you put it.
It can be ordered here http://www.freewebs....in/products.htm
I've done quite a few deals with Donna and she can be trusted. I would also suggest getting some 1oz Syringes. They make applying the lube really easy. The stuff stays slick, so putting it on your fingers.. it has to wear off, even if wiped with a towel.

Slick honey is good to use on the bolt for the most part, but it's a good idea to swap to the dow33 oil mix from time to time so the vented air will lube the noid.

I should mention also that it's a good idea to lube the #3 oring with dow55. No that's not a typo. That oring is a sealing oring and you'll have less problems if you lube that one with a swelling lube. If your getting excess friction (body heating up really hot at high rates of fire) lube it with dow33 to prevent it swelling any further.

#12 Babapb

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 08:52 PM

And also have you heard of the APE board for the Threshold is it good?
And what is the difference between dow 33 and the honey lube; is the honey lube just thicker, is the honey lube dow 33?

Thank you you have been a huge help.

Edited by Babapb, 30 May 2009 - 06:08 PM.

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#13 Panda Man

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Posted 07 June 2009 - 12:24 AM

thank you!

The Manual is great that comes with the Threshold, but detailed pics are tons better! :D

#14 no1mans1land1

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 10:20 AM

haha now i know how to take apart a threshhold i dont ave wish i had one though
People ask me "ever freeeze paintballs to really hurt people?" i reply "nah that shit doesnt work, i just use monster balls" (monster balls suck ass)
So when the gun says "o shit he pulled the trigger", the hopper says "o shit I better load" and then loads another paintball.
if the jonas brothers were about to jump off a buildings 95% of teens would be their pleading "DONT JUMP", if your in th at 5% that would grap a lawn chair and a bag of popcorn yelling "JUMP BITCH JUMP" put this is your sig
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#15 tripp

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 10:06 PM

wow this is proablyu the most informative guide ive read on this gun so far
i have had serious bolt stick problems throughout my time of owning the gun
but ive always used Sl33k or Hatersauce...
ima try out some of the lubes you recommend
Sponsored By: ANSGear, Valken Paintball Southern Maryland Paintball
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