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LORD_OF_WAR

Member Since 26 Jan 2009
Offline Last Active May 25 2009 10:12 PM
*****

Topics I've Started

Use an Instant Messenger? Phishing alert!!

26 February 2009 - 04:44 AM

Use an Instant Messenger?



Do you use instant messengers like AIM, AOL, MSN, Skype or others?



Ever get a random message from a buddy or someone on your list that has a random link on it?



I received one today from a buddy, and it linked me to a website that appeared to be affiliated with AOL (from AIM). But it was a fake and part of what appears to be a phishing scam.



DO NOT GO TO THIS SITE, I ONLY POSTED IT SO YOU KNOW NOT TO GO TO IT!



heyxd.com



Here is a site that you can look at to see how other people were affected by using it.



http://www.mywot.com/en/scorecard/www.heyxd.com (this site is ok)



Another site that is along the same line or some claim the older version of the site.




DO NOT GO TO THIS SITE, I ONLY POSTED IT SO YOU KNOW NOT TO GO TO IT!

www.omgxd.com




http://www.mywot.com/en/scorecard/omgxd.com (this site is ok)



Never enter your personal information into any site that asks for it, unless you are 100% sire it is legit.







Most sites will never ask you for your personal information or password.



This includes logging into sites that look like other sites. Always check the address bar.





Here is a great bit of information from PAYPAL about it and how to avoid it!



https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=xpt/Marketing/securitycenter/general/UnderstandPhishing-outside





If you knwo of any recent scams pleas post them so no one get phucked!







Sigs and why such a HUGE deal

18 February 2009 - 09:46 PM

I read the forum rules just like everyone else did, and i have also noted the warnings and people bragging about how many "Sigs they have slayed".
I under stand the reason for the Dimensions, and file size.. Bandwidth
Now for the TXT size limit. no bandwidth issue there, besides being ugly to look at @ times
.Not going to argue the point of Disturbing, basicly bad content.

my question is:Why do sooo many people have such issues with sigs. and why are they such a big deal?
It seem like some people enjoy coming on here just to "slay" SIGs.
they have more comments about peoples SIGs than they do actual positive/useful information about the game of paintball.
I know that is a MODS job to regulate people,

If a persons biggest problem is that they have is they used size 3 instead of 2 txt in their sig and recieve a 10% infraction, I'd say there are some uptight people.

I know there are warnings and it is in the rules, but for fuck sake dont delete their sig, replace it with some lame PIC and give em 10%


How hard would it be to:
MEMBER beadvised your sig does not comform to the rules and regulations of this site, please edit it other it will be removed and you will recieve an infraction based on the sevearity of your violoation.

Copy and paste that into every PM you send to save your self tha hastle of typing it every time.

In most cases like mine. I read the rules and haev seen the warnings, and forgot about the 2 size txt.

BOOM: 10% and sig completely gone, and some mod notching their belt.

Some people need to realize, or atleas in my opinon; this site is here for positive informaiton about the sport of paintball.

Small guide to Microswitches

18 February 2009 - 03:28 AM

Dont forget to rate me!


This is only a little bit of info; If anything I have posted is incorrect please let me know. Feel free to add your 2 cents!


Here is a little insight on what the Micro switch is and kind of how it works.


Here is a brief explanation from WIKIPEDIA.com

Micro switch
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


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A micro switch is a generic term used to refer to an
electric switch that is able to be actuated by very little physical force. They are very common due to their low cost and extreme durability, typically greater than 1 million cycles and up to 10 million cycles for heavy duty models. This durability is a natural consequence of the design. Internally a stiff metal strip must be bent to activate the switch. This produces a very distinctive clicking sound and a very crisp feel. When pressure is removed the metal strip springs back to its original state. Common applications of micro switches include computer mouse buttons and arcade game joysticks and buttons. Micro switches are commonly used in tamper switches on gate valves on fire sprinkler systems and other water pipe systems, where it is necessary to know if a valve has been opened or shut. They have also been used as anti-handling devices in boobytrapped improvised explosive devices manufactured by paramilitary groups e.g. the Provisional IRA during the The Troubles.[1][2]

The defining feature of micro switches is that a relatively small movement at the actuator button produces a relative large movement at the electrical contacts, which occurs at high speed (regardless of the speed of actuation). Most successful designs also exhibit hysteresis, meaning that a small reversal of the actuator is insufficient to reverse the contacts; there must be a significant movement in the opposite direction. Both of these characteristics help to achieve a clean and reliable interruption to the switched circuit.

The first micro switch was invented by Peter McGall in 1932 in Freeport, Illinois. McGall was an employee of the Burgess Battery Company at the time. In 1937 he started the company MICRO SWITCH, which still exists as of 2008. It is now owned by Honeywell Sensing and Control.

The micro switch, which is used to control, regulation, precision engineering, devices, and cars, is an electrical switch that is designed to be operated by the physical movement of mechanical devices, it's usually placement in small spaces. The principal characteristics of the standard micro switches are that it usually works with currents from 0.1A to 15A, it resists temperatures between -30 and 80 Celsius degrees. Nowadays exists a wide range of micro switches for specifics applications like level sensors or waterproof switches.



Here it is in layman's Terms:



When you Marker is off and you pull the trigger and hear that little click. Like I said it's off so it not the solenoid click.



What is happening is the back part of the trigger is hitting the metal bar that is hinged in a "V" shape. There is a little button inside the "V" that gets depressed.





When the trigger is pulled/switch triggered it closes the circuit.



Think of trigger/switch being a Drawbridge, when the trigger is not pulled the bridge is up, not allowing traffic (electricity) to flow. When you pull the trigger/activate the switch it lowers the bridge allowing traffic (electricity) to flow. When the trigger is released/deactivating the switch raises the bridges again, thus blocking traffic (electricity).



When the trigger is released it opens the circuit.

________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________


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A) Hinge Lever

B) "Button"

C) Neutral Contact / Post

D) Interior Contact Hinge Lever

E) Body of the Switch

F) Ground Contact / Post

G) Two Holes Used to Mount Switch

H) Positive Contact /Post



BASIC SETUP FIRING CYCLE:



What happens when you pull the trigger is:



The trigger depresses the Hinge Lever ("A"). The Hinge Lever pushes the "Button" ("B") down. The "Button" pushes the Interior Contact Hinge Lever ("D") down and breaks contact with Ground Contact / Post until it makes contact with the Ground Contact / Post ("F").



This closes the Circuit, allowing the electrical current to flow, actuating the solenoid.



What happens when you release the trigger is:


The trigger relieves pressure off the Hinge lever, which takes pressure off the Button. In turn the Interior Contact Hinge Lever breaks contact with the Ground Contact / Post. And returning to it home position.


This opens the Circuit, cutting the electrical flow.

____________



BASIC setup of a microswitch.



In the pictures you will see two diagrams that look very similar. The one on the left is an illustration of the switch when the trigger not being pulled; leaving the circuit OPEN. The illustration on the right is when the trigger is depressed; making the circuit CLOSED.


As you will see there are three Posts coming out of the bottom of the switch. In the BASIC SETUP we will NOT use all three. Only the ones labeled 1 and 2 will be used.





Since we only want the gun to fire once per trigger pull we are going to Solder one wire to post number one and solder the other wire to post number two.



Q: How do I know which color wire goes where????



A: For this application it does not matter because all we are doing is completing a circuit. Either wire could go to either post.




Once both wires are attached and the solder has cooled, then mount the switch back in the gun.



If you need help with that or forgot how it was, send me a Message or e-mail and I can try to help you figure it out.



_________________________



A) Hinge Lever

B) "Button"

C) Ground Contact / Post #1

D) Interior Contact Hinge Lever

E) Body of the Switch

F) Ground Contact / Post #2

G) Two Holes Used to Mount Switch

H) Positive Contact /Post



"RESPONSE" SETUP FIRING CYCLE:



What happens when you pull the trigger is:



The trigger depresses the Hinge Lever ("A"). The Hinge Lever pushes the "Button" ("B") down. The "Button" pushes the Interior Contact Hinge Lever ("D") down and breaks contact with the Ground Contact / Post#1 ("C") (which quickly opens the circuit) until it makes contact with the Ground Contact / Post#2 ("F"). This closes the Circuit, allowing the electrical current to flow; actuating the solenoid; firing for the first time in this firing cycle.



What happens when you release the trigger is:



The trigger relieves pressure off the Hinge lever, which takes pressure off the Button. In turn the Interior Contact Hinge Lever breaks contact with the Ground Contact / Post#2 (which quickly opens the circuit), Allowing it to make contact with Ground Contact / Post#1. This closes the Circuit, allowing the electrical current to flow; actuating the solenoid; firing for the second time in this firing cycle.

_______________________________________



"RESPONSE" setup of a microswitch.


In the pictures you will see two diagrams that look very similar. The one on the left is an illustration of the switch when the trigger not being pulled; leaving the circuit OPEN. The illustration on the right is when the trigger is depressed; making the circuit CLOSED.


As you will see there are three Posts coming out of the bottom of the switch. We will use all three.


Since we want the gun to fire twice per trigger pull we are going to solder one wire to post number one. Solder a small piece of extra wire to #2, long enough that it can reach post #3. The other end of this wire is going to be soldered to post #3 when the other wire coming from the board is soldered. So when you wire the other wire to #3 also solder in the end of the small piece of wire coming from #2. Essentially you will be soldering 2 wires at one time



Q: How do I know which color wire goes where????



A: For this application it does not matter because all we are doing is completing a circuit. Either wire could go to either post.




Once all wires are attached and the solder has cooled, then mount the switch back in the gun.



If you need help with that or forgot how it was send me a Message or e-mail and I can try to help you figure it out.

________________________________________________________________________________
______________________



Now that the lesson on electrical circuits is over.


Here is the STOCK micro switch info for a Proto Matrix Rail:



MODEL #: D2F-L

MANUFACTURE: OMRON (Japan)

STYLE: HINGE LEVER

CONTACT FORM: SPDT (Single Pole, Double Throw)

CONTACT CURRENT RATINGS: 3 A at 125 VAC / 2 A at 30 VDC (3AMPS @ 125 Voltage Alternating Current / 2 AMPS @ 30 Voltage Direct Current)

OPERATING FORCE: 80g (Grams) (This is how much pressure it takes to activate the switch)

TERMINATION STYLE: SOLDER PIN (3 metal pins that stick out of the switch that need to have wires soldered to them)





Here is the Micro switch that is marketed as the "Virtue Feather Trigger switch". Almost 70% Lighter trigger pull.





MODEL #: D2F-FL

MANUFACTURE: OMRON (Japan)

STYLE: HINGE LEVER

CONTACT FORM: SPDT (Single Pole, Double Throw)

CONTACT CURRENT RATINGS: 1 A at 125 VAC / 0.5 A at 30 VDC (1AMP @ 125 Voltage Alternating Current / 0.5 AMPS @ 30 Voltage Direct Current)

OPERATING FORCE: 25g (almost 70% less) (Grams) (This is how much pressure it takes to activate the switch)

[size=3]TERMINATION STYLE: SOLDER PIN (3 metal pins that stick out of the switch that need to have wires soldered to them)

PMR. Not sure what the problem is...

17 February 2009 - 03:07 AM

I have a PMR LE. ALL STOCK.



I used it on Saturday, then when I had to leave I let my cousin use it when I had to leave for the last 1 ˝ hrs. When I get it back from him he tell me is shot great and his friend wants to buy it. Cool more cash for me.



I get it home and go to my normal maintenance on it.



Turns on …Good
Test eyes by braking beam with finger … Good
Turn off eyes …Good
Pull trigger to test solenoid …NOTHING but the click of the Microswitch.




I asked him what happened to it… He said it shot great the entire time he used it. When he was done he removed the tank and hopper. He never even opened the grip to change modes. I have absolutely no reason to think he is lying to me. He has broke my stuff in the past (even a very expensive computer) and has always had the balls to tell me.



Things I have tried thus far.



New battery
Disassemble the trigger frame and re-assemble.
Hand grips off
Battery/wire harness off
  • Unhook eye cable
  • Un hook wires from microswitch off board (left them hooked to Micro)
  • Unhook wires from solenoid (obviously left them in the solenoid)
  • None of the wires appear to be kinked, pulled from the white harness things, or sliced.
[/list]



· Take out trigger



Nothing on the board looks broken. None of the solders look bad or melted. All the internals are fine. IE. Bolt and such.



I am at a loss here.

I could use some help.

Don't just read and then post saying get a new gun, or buy a new frame, or get a new solenoid. At least give me a reason why.

Considerable trade and/or selling price for a Marq7?

11 February 2009 - 03:26 AM

IYO (in your opinion) what would be a considerable trade and/or selling price for a Marq7?

It is in great shape Very few scratches. Shoots GREAT! I am in the military and know how to keep up with the maintenance of a "GUN" (PB marker).



Dust Blue

4 eyes

Pillow Bolt

Empire Rail

Empire ASA On/Off

Contract Killer Grips



Posted Image


I am not trying to post this as a B/S/T, nor do I want to break forum rules.